Traveling With Dogs

 


Visitors: 111

Traveling with dogs can sometimes be a challenge. In our case we have two dogs that are as different as day and night. One is an 80 lb. Labrador and the other a 5 lb. Papillion. So you might imagine what works for one doesn't necessarily work for the other.

Living in South Florida we have been known to have our occasional hurricane. I'm here to tell you that I HATE storms. They announce one coming and the dust is trailing behind me! To complicate my fear of storms we have the 2 dogs and an elderly father that lives with us. So our exit out of town needs to be well thought out.

First of all, its important to have a list of necessary supplies. By having the list you aren't rushing around at the last minute worrying that you've remembered everything. Things you might include on your list are your dog's or cat's vaccination record. If you don't have one, at the very least have the vet's phone number. He or she can always provide the information to you, should the need arise. Have a list of any medications your pet may be taking and the proper dosage. Water and food dishes, leads, collars and a few toys are a necessity when traveling with your pet. You want them to feel as comfortable and “at home” as possible.

For our lab, we have the option to take one of the back seats out so that he has plenty of room to stretch out. The Papillion gets an old pillow to rest on, or you may have a dog bed. Try to keep as much familiar for them as possible. This assists in keeping restlessness to a minimum.

We research our route well before heading out to make sure of which hotels are pet friendly. Be sure and call the hotel ahead of time. We have found that hotels we visited in the past, stopped accepting pets. We also found a wide range of additional fees for the stay. Holiday Inn Express is one of our personal favorites. I can not stress enough the need to phone ahead!

While in the car be sure your pet is always secured. We keep our dogs on a lead and have found this very helpful. Especially when someone is exiting or entering the car you don't want the pet to dash out into traffic or up a tree and be harmed.

Like people, pets appreciate stretching their legs and the chance to relieve themselves. Most rest stops have designated areas for you to use. Be sure you take this time to water and exercise them. A happy pet makes for a happy owner and a pleasant trip.

Find PetFriendlyHotels and DiscountHotels at our HotelFinder website.

(475)

Article Source:


 
Rate this Article: 
 
Solid Retriever Training Turns Labs into Gun Dogs and Duck Dogs
Rated 4 / 5
based on 5 votes
ArticleSlash

Related Articles:

Top Ten Ways to Save Money While Traveling With Your Dogs

by: Debbie Price (July 06, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure/Pet Friendly Rentals)

7 Important Traveling Tips When Traveling in South America

by: Benny Horowitz (July 25, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure/Destination Tips)

7 Important Traveling Tips When Traveling in Australia and New Zealand

by: Benny Horowitz (September 06, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure)

7 Important Traveling Tips When Traveling to Middle East

by: Benny Horowitz (September 06, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure/Destination Tips)

7 Important Traveling Tips When Traveling in West Europe

by: Benny Horowitz (July 12, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure/Destination Tips)

7 Important Traveling Tips When Traveling to North America

by: Benny Horowitz (September 06, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure/Destination Tips)

7 Important Traveling Tips When Traveling to East Asia

by: Benny Horowitz (September 06, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure)

Traveling to Miami and then traveling some more by Jean Francois

by: Jean Francois (July 07, 2011) 
(Travel and Leisure/Adventure Travel)

Traveling Solo Does Not Mean Traveling Single

by: Jonathan Hunt (July 03, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure)

Solid Retriever Training Turns Labs into Gun Dogs and Duck Dogs

by: Chris Robertson (December 23, 2005) 
(Pets)