Already on ArticleSlash?

Forgot your password? Sign Up
  Articleslash »
» Science

Science & Reference & Education Article Category 

Science & Reference & Education Article Category
Articles about or concerning Science, Environment, Scientific Events, Ecology, Genetics, Scientific Fields, Scientific Advances, Disease, Scientific Commentary, Biology, and Human Anatomy.
Latest Articles

Curious About Scanning Electrochemical Microscopes?

by:
 Steven P. Ross (September 09, 2008)  As a chemist, the microscope that you need is the scanning electrochemical microscope. This microscope is one that is used all over the world, allowing chemists to study different chemical reactions right under there eyes. This microscope will show the entire reaction right on your computer screen. A scientist is able to study organisms with out having to be in an airtight slide. They .. (Science)

Mycobacterium - Tuberculosis and Leprosy - New Problems From Old Diseases

by:
 George Durrell (September 08, 2008)  Mycobacteria are abundant in soil and water but are more infamous for the diseases that they can cause. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is perhaps the most well known member of the group and is the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. However, there are other species of mycobacteria, for example Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy, Mycobacterium bovis causes tuberculosis in cattle, .. (Science)

Who Discovered DNA, Life's Building Block?

by:
 Robert Grazian (September 08, 2008)  DNA is a nucleic acid, is a kind of instruction manual that resides cells of all living things, and even types of viruses. Eukaryotic organisms or those who have a nucleus in their cells store the DNA material in the nucleus. These instructions tell each cell how to develop, and what functions to perform. Prokaryotes organisms, like archae and bacteria, do not have a nucleus, so they .. (Science)

Solar PV

by:
 Michael Ashcroft (September 08, 2008)  Solar Photovoltaic, or Solar PV, is the method used to convert sunlight into electricity. Sunlight shines on a solar panel, some sort of witchcraft happens, and electricity comes out the other end. Photovoltaic is a made up word for Physics, really: photo means light, and voltaic refers to the energy we get from it. Anyway, let me explain what the witchcraft really is! Behind the Scenes . (Science)

Top 5 Secrets to Easy Science Fair Projects

by:
 Esther Hoover (September 07, 2008)  Finding quality scientific easy science fair projects doesn't have to be a big research chore. Just keep in mind that you will be in competition with every other family who is looking for that special science project to win the fairs with. It is also well to keep in mind that the end goal of all of this is to promote science education and participation. This article will focus primarily . (Science)

How Does a Tesla Coil Work

by:
 Robert Benjamin (September 07, 2008)  One time when I was a young boy I saw a documentary on TV, that happened to show a large tesla coil in operation at some college, from that moment on the Tesla Coil bug had bitten me. I knew someday I would have to own one of these wonderful devices. The loud noise, the powerful arcs of flowing electric was completely amazing. Now that I am getting older, I am the proud owner of three .. (Science)

Sahelanthropus - Fracas Over Purported Human Ancestor

by:
 Joel Kontinen (September 06, 2008)  In 2001 a nearly complete skull was found in the Chadian desert. Called Toumai or Sahelanthropus tchadensis, it was announced to be a 7 million year old human ancestor. However, some critics refused to believe that the fossil had anything to do with human ancestry. Due to the small size of the skull, they calculated that Toumai could not be taller than 120 centimeters (four feet) and .. (Science)

Introduction to the Arcon Method

by:
 Jaime Parejo Garcia (September 06, 2008)  Method Canine Catastrophe Rescue consists of using dogs to find people that have been accidentally buried for whatever reason (explosions, earthquakes, structural flaws, hurricanes, tornadoes, avalanches, landslides, etc. ). Arcon is a system to train and intervene in catastrophes with canine rescue teams. It was created by Jaime Parejo after twelve years of study and research. The .. (Science)

Microbiology - A Brief Introduction to Microorganisms

by:
 George Durrell (September 05, 2008)  Microbiology is the study of “small life" - in other words the study of all living organisms that are too small to be visible with the naked eye and are usually visible only through a microscope. Such organisms are referred to as microorganisms or microbes. Microorganisms were first observed over three hundred years ago and it is estimated that only one percent of the species of .. (Science)

Blue-Eyed Genealogy Study

by:
 Robert Grazian (September 05, 2008)  At times, it seems as if our society is fascinated with baby blues. Preferences for fair skin and blue eyes stretch back in Europe at least to the Middle Ages. Fair skin and light eyes were seen as indicators of fertility and beauty. America adopted those ideals and Hollywood reinforced them with a long line of blue-eyed blondes such as Marilyn Monroe as the nation's sex symbols. Many .. (Science)

The Mysterious Allure of Fields and Forces

by:
 MaAnna Stephenson (September 05, 2008)  The actions of invisible fields and forces on objects in the material realm have fascinated humans for eons. The idea of a force came into existence long before the idea of a guiding field was recognized. In fact, fields of all sorts are just now coming under the microscope of collaborative scientific and intuitive investigation. Since both fields and forces are invisible and can only .. (Science)

Rechargeable Batteries Can Only Be Charged 300-500 Times - Part 1

by:
 Dan Hagopian (September 04, 2008)  In my last article I explained how that the simple task of charging a battery is far from easy. For example I examined how a battery, a device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy, has two internal electrodes - an anode (the positive end) and a cathode (the negative end), and that between the two electrodes runs an electrical current caused primarily from a voltage .. (Science)

An Overview Off Alternative Fuels

by:
 Rudy Van Lancker (September 04, 2008)  Alternative fuels may seem like a new topic or new invention but in reality companies, organizations and individuals have been researching and developing new ways to power vehicles. In fact, regular gasoline has contained ethanol for some years now and many countries around the global are mandating minimum ethanol requirements. For example, Canada, the United States, Britain, Argentina .. (Science)

Impossible Flying Dream Comes to Life

by:
 Shad Connelly (August 12, 2008)  Perhaps no other invention idea has failed to live up to its promise like the jetpack. Since the 1920s, science-fiction literature and films have propagated the notion that we'd all be flying around with jet-powered backpacks by now. But, despite noble efforts, that dream hasn't quite come to fruition. . . Or has it? For 27 years, Glenn Martin, an inventor from New Zealand, has been .. (Science)

Clocks - From the Sundial to the NTP Server

by:
 Richard N Williams (August 11, 2008)  Time is concept that has preoccupied the thoughts of humans since the earliest civilisations. It may only have been in the last century that we have begun to understand time, thanks to the work of Albert Einstein, but measuring its passing has been an important part of society. Historically time has been measured using the Earth's rotation and other astronomical cycles such as the .. (Science)

How to Study Genetics

by:
 Jordan Castle (August 11, 2008)  Genetics is a notorious course for demanding a high-volume of information in a short amount of time. However, there are studying methods to assist students in learning efficiently and effectively. I have studied and interviewed groups of medical and science students that have mastered their course work. It is true that there are specific and detailed guidelines that these students .. (Science)

Ancient Computer Yields More Surprises

by:
 Joel Kontinen (August 10, 2008)  When I took my first course in computer science I learned that Charles Babbage (1791-1871) invented the mechanical computer. But now it seems that the Greeks already made sophisticated calculators over 2000 years ago. In the first century BC a Roman ship sank near the Greek island of Antikythera. Its cargo lay hidden at the bottom of the sea for two millennia until in 1901 a sponge .. (Science)

Weather Balloon

by:
 Shailaza Singh (August 08, 2008)  A Weather Balloon is a high altitude balloon, which carries measuring instruments aloft to send back the information on atmospheric pressure temperature & humidity by means of small expandable measuring device called as RADISONDE. Whenever any weather balloon is launched its always necessary to continuously monitor these conditions WEATHER BALLOON: Weather Balloon is made up of .. (Science)

What is the Actual Definition of Forensic Science?

by:
 J.J. Yong (August 08, 2008)  Forensic science is the process of resolving legal issues with the use of science. This is made by using scientific principles to things where law is involved. Through scientific principles, crime scene investigations and other field technology continues to evolve. A scientist's education can be put into different fields. This field has two folds - to be able to analyze physical .. (Science)

10 Interactive Science Education Websites For Grades K-12

by:
 David Wetzel (August 07, 2008)  As science teachers prepare to go back to school for the next school year, some have already returned, they are always searching for good online resources to supplement their lessons. It is always nice when someone helps them by previewing science websites and make recommendations. The best science education websites are interactive, allowing students to make changes to or manipulate .. (Science)

Stem Cells - The Master Cells of Human Body

by:
 Melvin Ngiam (August 07, 2008)  The Stem cells are predominantly called the “master cells" of the human body because of their ability to create all other tissues, organs, and systems in the body. The stem cells are the building blocks of your blood and immune system. They are the factory of the blood system and continually make new copies of themselves and produce cells that make every other type of blood -Red .. (Science)

What is Solar Energy Really?

by:
 Richard Hund (August 06, 2008)  Solar energy is the energy that is produced by our sun. During the fusion process that the sun undergoes during its lifetime, it emits radiation. The fusion process produces many different wavelengths of radiation and sub-atomic particles. Collecting and converting usable energy from solar radiation can be accomplished by using many different forms of technology and includes various .. (Science)

How to Study Human Physiology

by:
 Jordan Castle (August 06, 2008)  I have studied and interviewed groups of medical and science students that have excelled in their course work. It is true that there are specific and detailed guidelines that these students adhere to and credit for their academic success. With some time and applying these study skills to your studies you can greatly improve your academic performance. The following are study strategies .. (Science)

Female Anatomy Models - Educating Women About Their Bodies

by:
 Stephen Lamb (August 06, 2008)  Female anatomical models are important medical tools that are useful for showing and demonstrating aspects of female reproductive parts and their processes. Doctors and female reproductive organ specialists must often explain complex processes, conditions, and procedures dealing with the female anatomy. Teachers also require female reproductive models in order to demonstrate the female .. (Science)

Dandelion Rubber - From Annoying Weeds to Airplane Tires

by:
 Shad Connelly (August 05, 2008)  Though it often goes unnoticed, nature and technology are significantly entangled. For example, landing an airplane would be nearly impossible without wheels produced from Hevea brasiliensis, commonly referred to as the rubber tree. Perhaps we don't make that connection because it's not right in front of us (most of the world's rubber trees reside in Southeast Asia). But a new rubber .. (Science)

Writing of Chemical Equations

by:
 Sean Chua Lian Heng (August 04, 2008)  Mole calculations is an inherent and important part of studying Chemistry. There is not doubt that mathematical calculations are important in many areas of higher education in Chemistry. Before we can even do mole calculations, the first step is always to write the balance chemical equations involving a particular chemical reaction. In Chemistry, an equation represents what occurs in a . (Science)

How to Study Human Anatomy

by:
 Jordan Castle (August 02, 2008)  I have studied and interviewed groups of medical and science students that have excelled in their course work.   It is true that there are specific and detailed guidelines that these students adhere to and credit for their academic success.   With some time and applying these study skills to your studies you can greatly improve your academic performance.   The following are study .. (Science)

Science, Information and Valid Reasons For Your Perceptions

by:
 Sarfaraz Ali (August 01, 2008)  This word has been derived from a Latin word that means information. It revolves around the detection, comprehension and the information regarding the working of the corporeal earth, in addition to the availability of accurate evidence that supports its statements and aid in the attainment of a better perception. Detailed studies and observations are conducted in this regards say for .. (Science)

Cryptozoology Science of Hidden Animals

by:
 Arthur Campbell (July 31, 2008)  Cryptozoology is the science of hidden animals. The term was coined in the 1950s by Dr. Bernard Heuvelmans, who became president of the International Society of Cryptozoology when it was formed in 1982. The notion of hidden animals covers a range of meanings. First, there are animals that are known to science that are extremely elusive and only rarely sighted, such as giant squid. .. (Science)

An Introduction to Gasification Plant Technology

by:
 Steve D Evans (July 31, 2008)  The most basic definition of gasification is that it is any chemical or heat process used to convert a substance to a gas. Coal has been gasified ever since the industrial revolution to produce “town gas". This was once done in the local gas works, and every town had one. Heating the coal under controlled conditions with insufficient air to provide complete combustion produces a .. (Science)

Producing Rose Oil How Roses Are Turned Into Oil For Perfume

by:
 Mark D Jordan (July 28, 2008)  One of the most popular scents for perfume is the scent of real roses. Traditionally it is believed that Arab chemists were the first to find a way to produce useable perfume oils from roses. Rose oil commands a very high price, because it is so laborious to extract. The harvesting of the buds is done by hand before sunrise and the petals are used to create oil and scent extracts the .. (Science)

Cyanide Interferences and Solutions For Analysis

by:
 William Lipps (July 26, 2008)  Introduction A sample taken for chemical analysis is supposed to be a snapshot of the quantity of analyte present at the time the sample was taken. Reactions of the analyte with other constituents in the sample matrix cannot be allowed to proceed, nor can loss of the analyte by evaporation, precipitation, or oxidation. The act of adding a chemical and refrigeration is intended to .. (Science)

How the Water Distillation Process Works

by:
 Larry Wardell (July 25, 2008)  One of the best methods of purifying water is the distillation process. It all begins with a heat source that vaporizes water causing it to become steam. As the steam cools and condenses back into water the contaminants are separate out due to boiling point differences. The result? Crystal clear, perfect water. Don't be fooled into thinking that your drinking water is pure just because . (Science)

Ethanol Fuel Research

by:
 Brett Davis (July 25, 2008)  Ethanol is a viable, homegrown energy alternative to fossil fuel and is available today in E10 (10 percent ethanol/90 percent gasoline) and E85 (85 percent ethanol/15 percent gasoline) blends. Used as a clean-burning fuel additive, ethanol is a renewable fuel made from plants, usually from sugar cane and maize. There are five parts to the ethanol process; Conversion, fermentation, .. (Science)

Fuel Cell Research Towards a Viable Alternative Fuel Choice

by:
 Brett Davis (July 25, 2008)  It is said that in future almost all the vehicles will operate on fuel cells alone or with hybrid systems using both batteries and fuel cells in which the battery supplies power for acceleration and speed. Now all the major automotive manufacturers are on the process of developing fuel cells as the replacement for the conventional automobile engine to provide advantage of high .. (Science)

Getting the Best Fuel The Many Uses of Diesel

by:
 Timothy Z. Tan (July 24, 2008)  Diesel fuel may be popular as the fuel that makes that makes your car go from one place to another. Without it, many of the automobiles around the world would find themselves at a standstill. But diesel does much more than make your family move across the state. It is the key to the success of several other activities and industries. And because of the rising prices of gas around the .. (Science)

Science As a Media Event

by:
 Pranay Deepak Rupani (July 23, 2008)  One need not make any extensive surveys of different media to provide evidence for this failure. It is enough to see how sports has managed to gain more coverage in various media over the last few decades vis-a-vis science. One may argue that this is so because there are always some sports events occurring all over the world which naturally draw the attention of media. But contention .. (Science)

Exhibits of Science at the International Crop Research Institute For Semi Arid Tropics

by:
 Pranay Deepak Rupani (July 23, 2008)  The visit to ICRISAT (International Crop Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics) was with a purpose to know and understand how research institutes validate their research and popularise it to the public. Since the institute is funded by international organisations and governments the explanation is in the form of a display of semi arid conditions. The approach followed by them was in .. (Science)

Where Does Solar Energy Come From?

by:
 Koz Huseyin (July 23, 2008)  Solar energy is making a big impact today. In the world we live, we have put major strain on natural resources. But, there is a renewable energy source, which is becoming a viable source to meet the needs of humanity, it is called solar energy. But, where does solar energy come from? Imagine a home that is powered by a residential solar energy system. This home has electricity 24 hours .. (Science)

The World of Polymer Chemistry

by:
 Sean Chua Lian Heng (July 23, 2008)  Many of you have heard or learned about Polymer in school. In layman's term, it is known to many as “Plastics", just like what my mother would call these group of substances. Polymers are an important class of covalent molecular compounds in which the molecules are very big (macromolecules) and are made up of a large number of small repeating units or molecules linked together. .. (Science)

It is Almost Incomprehensible All Your Liver Does

by:
 Dave Dale (July 22, 2008)  The liver is the largest gland and the largest organ in the body, weighing on average 3 pounds and 6 inches thick. It holds approximately 13%(about one pint or. 0.5 liters) of you total blood supply at any given moment. The liver performs over 5,000 important functions and the liver produces 13,000 different chemicals and 2,000 various enzymes to keep your body functioning. Most blood .. (Science)

Size Matters Predatory Dinosaurs Bigger Than T Rex

by:
 Salvador Paez (July 22, 2008)  Everyone knows what a Tyrannosaurus Rex is these days. From the books, to the video games, to the popular TV shows, books and even some movies, this dinosaur, long thought to be the largest predatory dinosaur of all time, has dominated the mass media because of its immense size, crushing bite strength, intimidating looks and fascinating mystique. Ask any kid which dinosaur they consider . (Science)

The Functions of the Nephron of Kidney

by:
 Mc Raflesia (July 20, 2008)  A nephron is the fundamental structural and functional part of the kidney. Its principal function is to control the absorption of water and soluble substances such as sodium salts by filtering the blood, reabsorbing what is required and excreting the rest as urine. A nephron gets rid of wastes from the body, controls blood volume and pressure, regulates levels of electrolytes and .. (Science)

A Normal Kidney Size

by:
 Mc Raflesia (July 20, 2008)  It is usual for doctors to presume that you understand the fundamental structure of the kidneys. When arguing the outcomes of certain radiology tests (for instance ultrasounds and CT's), it is likely that they will what is wrong but not needed what is normal. Lacking understanding what is normal, it is difficult to recognize the value of how something is abnormal. Kidney size is not .. (Science)

Everything Does Not Happen For a Reason Biotechnology Creates Changes

by:
 Rick London (July 20, 2008)  I have a strong faith. And very few things shake it. One thing I do remember shaking it and shaking it hard was waking up the morning of April 16, 2007, and turning on the television only to see a “special news report". There was some kind of shooting (in progress) happening at W. Va. Tech but details were “still sketchy". As always, I tried to think the best, and perhaps .. (Science)

Evolution and the Decadence of the West

by:
 Joel Kontinen (July 20, 2008)  Many Darwinists assume that critics of evolution are mostly motivated by religion. They also suppose that creationism and intelligent design are American phenomena that have only recently set foot in Europe. However, reality is much more complicated. William Thomson (1824-1907), who is better known as Lord Kelvin and for his many inventions, was an Irish-born mathematician and engineer . (Science)

Melissa (Lemon Balm) Oil

by:
 Prashantkumar Kudli Shrinivas (July 20, 2008)  Melissa oil is extracted from Melissa officinalis of the Labiatae family and is also known as Lemon balm. This plant from the Mediterranean region grows to about 60 cm and likes soil with high iron content and has small serrated slightly hairy leaves and small white-pink flowers. The flowers are very attractive to bees; the name ‘Melissa’ is the Greek word for honeybee and .. (Science)

The Science of Astronomy Today

by:
 Koz Huseyin (July 18, 2008)  When we think of astronomy, we may be inclined to think that it only deals with scientists and astronomers looking up at objects in space with a telescope. However, there is far more to astronomy than simply looking at objects in space. In this article, we will look into the science of astronomy. The countdown has started, and astronauts in are preparing for a journey that will take .. (Science)

Technology Used in Astronomy Today

by:
 Koz Huseyin (July 18, 2008)  Astronomy is a topic in science. For most of astronomy, there are scientific instruments in use. These can be telescopes, which have different technologies, and also that of using computers. In this article, we will take a look at technology used in astronomy today. Since the dawn of time, man has looked up at the stars in amazement. What were these shimmering lights in the night sky? .. (Science)

Brass Monkeys Facts About Snow and Ice

by:
 Mark Boardman (July 18, 2008)  The entire planet was once covered in ice around 700 million years ago. This glaciation, so the ‘snowball earth’ theory postulates, lasted for 160 million years. Some of the largest snowflakes ever recorded fell over England in April 1951 and measured 12.5 cm (5 in) across. Snow falls at approximately 2 m/s (6 feet/s), which is about a quarter the speed of rain. It is .. (Science)




Related Categories