Basic Snowboard Care - Snowboard Wax Jobs and Why They are Important

 


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The overall surface of a snowboard should be kept smooth and able to easily prevent debris from collecting on the board itself. The smooth surface makes it much easier to control the board while in play. The better your control of the board, the easier is it to get the most of your speed and ease of turning. Obviously, the less effort you have to exert in order to control the board, the better your endurance and the longer you can actually engage in the sport in a short period of time. This can be very important when you choose to engage in snowboard competitions.

As far as the board itself, a good quality snowboard wax helps keep your board in top condition, extending the life of the board itself. Over time, a board that is not maintained properly with a good wax job will develop a rough texture and more stress will be placed on the board as it is used. The wax will help you to get the most out of your board, by extending the life of the board.

When it comes to applying the snowboard wax, make sure you have a dry room that is well ventilated to do the job. As with many products, the fumes can make you dizzy. Make sure that you have laid some sort of a cloth, such as an old sheet or a dropcloth, so the excess wax will have something to drip onto. You also will need to have a couple of blocks or bricks to prop the board onto, so that it is not resting on the ground. A cheap pair of household gloves will also help to protect your hands while applying the wax.

Snowboard wax usually comes in the form of a bar, similar to a bar of soap. Before you begin to apply the wax, heat it up by using an old iron. If you do not have a waxing iron, you can use a conventional iron that is free of rust and ideally with a non-stick surface. The idea is to have the wax liquefied enough to spread, but not so hot that it will begin to smoke.

After dripping the wax onto your board, spread a coat evenly across the surface, using a plastic scraper, similar to the types that are used to scrape frost and ice from the windshield of a car. The layer does not have to be a thick coating, but it is important that it be as even as you can manage. Once the wax is evenly spread, allow it to cool. While it is cooling, the wax will begin to seep into the texture of the board.

Once the wax is cooled, use another scraper to gently remove any excess wax. Don't use the scraper to dig down into the board. What you want is a very clear veneer on the board with no spots that have any wax buildup. For a final step, take an abrasive pad and polish the surface to further smooth out the layer of wax.

There is some difference of opinion on how often you should wax your snowboard. A good rule of thumb is to apply a new coat of snowboard wax after every three uses. You can adjust this based on your own experience, and how much of a beating your wax job takes during your routine use of the board. Also remember that a board which has been in storage for some time should have a new coat of wax before you begin to use it again.

By taking proper care of your snowboard, you will greatly extend the life of the board and enjoy your snowboarding time even more. Snowboard wax is one of the best ways to ensure your board stays in the best operating condition at all times.

For vital information on all things concerned with snowboarding visit Snowboarding .

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