Already on ArticleSlash?

Forgot your password? Sign Up

Dog safety on your vacation

 


Visitors: 207

Being able to take a vacation is a treat for most people. It is even more of a treat for your dog. It is rare that your pet will be able to get out of the same area and explore new regions of the world that he has never seen before. However, keeping your pet safe while taking a vacation is very important. Planning ahead for any potential problems can keep everyone happy, your dog safe, and your vacation fun.

A bored dog can become a distraction for a driver, making him rather dangerous to have in the car. It is very important to keep your dog well entertained during the trip. Stopping every so often to stretch your own legs, as well as to let your bridled buddy out to go to the bathroom, can give you an excuse to play a game with your pooch and make the remainder of his trip as enthusiastic as possible. It is also a smart idea to keep a few of his favorite toys and plenty of tasty treats on hand to keep his mind busy. This will help ease his boredom and make him a little easier to have in the vehicle.

If your dog does not particularly care for car rides, you may need to have dog crates for your pet to stay in while on the road. This will make him a little less of a danger to himself, and to his owners. Make sure that you buckle in the crate to ensure that it does not slide in the vehicle, or can be thrown free of the vehicle in an accident. There are special seat belt attachments for cars and mini-vans that work for this purpose. It is much safer to have your pooch tied in then to be free in the vehicle, where he can be thrown about and receive serious injuries. Simply being prepared for everything that may come can help you keep your pet safe and happy on your vacation.

Other ways to ensure your dogs’ health and well being on a vacation trip is to make sure that you travel safe. Do not leave your pet in the back of a pick-up truck during the trip as he can be injured if you need to stop suddenly, or if you get into an accident. Also, a dog can jump out of the back of the truck if they are left in the back for too long. Keeping your pet in the back seat of a car is a good idea, but make sure that your pooch has an empty stomach before you leave. Feeding your pet just before, or during the trip can lead to car sickness. However, keeping a bottle of water around is a very good idea. It is important that your dog has plenty of water while they are traveling.

Pet Article courtesy of http://pet-articles.blogspot.com .

More about pets at www.petweb.gr

(527)

Article Source:


 
Rate this Article: 
 
Safety Signs - One of the Best Ways to Ensure Fire Safety in Your Establishments
Rated 4 / 5
based on 5 votes
ArticleSlash

Related Articles:

Basic Travel and Vacation Safety Tips

by: Lydia Quinn (August 29, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure/Destination Tips)

Safety Tips For Vacation Condo Owners

by: Eric Blackwell (August 13, 2008) 
(Real Estate/Property Management)

Safety & Spending Tips For Single Seniors Going For a Vacation

by: Matt Murren (September 18, 2008) 
(Travel and Leisure)

Womens Safety Tips 3 Common Mistakes Women Make About Personal Safety

by: Kelly Rudolph (July 10, 2008) 
(Womens Interests)

Ahoy Mates - Boating Safety And Security Is Just As Important As Personal Safety

by: Susan Eaton (May 24, 2007) 
(Travel and Leisure)

Add Safety work wear its so important in your business and can be a great ..

by: Mark Richard Taylor (December 23, 2011) 
(Shopping and Product Reviews/Fashion Style)

Acetylene and Oxygen Cutting Torch OSHA Says Oxyfuel Safety is Part of Welding ..

by: Jody Collier (June 15, 2008) 
(Business/Workplace Safety)

Access Criminal Records - Help Ensure Your Safety and the Safety of Your Family

by: Greg Tredan (December 04, 2008) 
(Legal/Criminal Law)

Women's Safety Tip - Real Life Story - Who is Responsible For Your Safety?

by: Kelly Rudolph (August 31, 2008) 
(Womens Interests)

Safety Signs - One of the Best Ways to Ensure Fire Safety in Your Establishments

by: Brian Ayling (December 17, 2008) 
(Reference and Education/Survival and Emergency)