How Not To Get Out Of A Speeding Ticket

 


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The best advice for beating a speeding ticket would be to show you how NOT to get out of a speeding ticket. This article is all about the wrong way to go about handling your court case.

Once you've read all these worthless defenses, visit my site at the end of this page for proven traffic court defense strategies to easily have your speeding ticket dismissed!

Beg, Plead, Whine and Ask For Forgiveness

There is actually a book out there that condones this defense strategy. C’mon - is this really a valid defense? You aren’t a little kid that has been caught with your hands in the cookie jar.

This is real life and if you think that begging and pleading with the judge is going to get you out of a speeding ticket, you got another thing coming.

Don’t downgrade your dignity by whining in court. It won’t work. Your only sure fire way to beat this ticket is to be armed with proven courtroom tactics and strategies based on actual law. Nothing else you do will work.

Blame Your Speedometer

Oh, the infamous “My speedometer wasn't working Your Honor". If there's one defense the judge gets sick of hearing, it's this one.

The fact that your speedometer wasn't working (which the judge will believe to be a lie) isn't a valid defense. And if it really wasn't working, you should have gotten fixed!

At least that's what the judge will say.

Try To Accuse the Officer of Signaling You Out

Just go to court and point out to the judge that the officer purposely gave you a ticket when you didn’t deserve one.

Maybe he didn’t like you because you are of Middle Eastern decent? Maybe you were a black man driving in a predominately white neighborhood?

Whatever the circumstances may be, don’t accuse the officer of racial discrimination or profiling. It rarely works.

Racial discrimination is an all too common defense and you are going to need some proof to back up what you are saying.

* Has the officer been accused in the past of racial profiling?

* Has the officer been reprimanded in the past for racial profiling?

* Has the officer admitted in the past that he is a racist?

* Have you filed a complaint against the officer in the past for racial discrimination?

Accusing the officer of something without anything concrete to back it up is a no-win situation.

Keeping With the Flow of Traffic

Don’t try to argue that there were other people speeding and you were simply keeping up with the flow of traffic. The fact still remains that you were speeding and using this defense hurts your case rather than help it.

By arguing this defense, you have actually admitted to the fact that you were speeding. First you claimed that other motorists were speeding. Next, you admitted that you wee keeping up with the flow of traffic.

In essence, you just admitted to speeding.

Now, no matter what you say, you are a traffic violator under your own admission. The judge will have no choice but to find you GUILTY!

Never try to get out of a speeding ticket using this excuse.

Argue That Your Actions Did Not Cause Harm to Anyone

Maybe not coming to a complete stop at the stop sign in a very quiet neighborhood at 3:00 AM did not hurt anyone, but it still doesn’t deny the fact that you broke the law.

Whether anyone was hurt or not is beside the point. The point is that you broke the law - no ifs, ands, or buts about it.

Argue That You Were Not Aware of the Law at the Time

So, you say that you didn’t know the speed limit had changed from 35 mph to 25 mph on the same street? Do you know what the judge is going to say?

“Ignorance of the law is no excuse”!

“GUILTY”!

Playing dumb will not help you get out of a speeding ticket.

Attack the Officer’s Training of the Radar Gun

Think maybe the officer hasn’t had adequate training with the radar gun? Can you prove it? If not, you are fighting another losing battle.

The courts and the judge will accept the officer’s testimony that he has had proper training. Nothing you say will change their minds.

Other books will tell you to ask the officer to prove that he has had proper training with the radar unit by submitting all the proper documents and certifications. However, they conveniently fail to mention the fact that in court he DOESN’T have to show you anything!

It is assumed by the courts that as an officer of the law, he has had proper training and no further proof is required of him. So much for this defense strategy.

Only go this route if you yourself have proof of your own allegation. Needless to say, this proof is almost impossible to get.

Explain That the Officer Pulled Over the Wrong Person

Mistakes can and do happen. Officers have been known to lock on to a certain vehicle and momentarily lose sight of it and end up pulling over a similar looking vehicle by mistake. It happens.

It is also very hard to prove.

You know the officer might have made a mistake, but how do you go to court with this defense strategy? Accusations can only get you so far. When the judge asks for proof, then what?

Again, it’s your word versus the officer’s. Who is the judge going to believe?

Accuse the Officer of Mishandling the Radar Gun

Maybe the officer made a mistake when he was operating the radar gun. It’s possible that he brought the radar gun up too fast and instead of your vehicle, he clocked the motion of his air conditioner fan instead. This actually happens more times than you think.

But once more, this defense will get you no where for the simple fact that you were not in the officer’s car at the time and were not an eye witness to him mishandling the radar gun.

It’s your word against his - again!

If you’ve noticed, most of these defenses involve blatant accusations. You are merely accusing the officer of not doing his job, whether purposely or negligibly.

Not only is this an insult to the police officer, but it is also an insult to the courts. Now the judge starts getting mad! The last person you want to agitate in that courtroom is the judge.

You had better back up what you say with hard physical evidence. If it’s your word against the officer’s - you know the rest.

Never accuse the officer of anything in that courtroom. Accusations only make you sound more desperate.

If you want to get out of a speeding ticket there is a far easier, more productive way to do it, without pissing anybody off with deliberate allegations.

Proof is everything in any courtroom in America. You can’t convict somebody of murder just by pointing the finger at him. You need a dead body, murder weapon, and a motive. Otherwise, that person gets off free and clear.

The same goes for you. If you say the officer made a mistake, can you prove it? If not, then there is absolutely no way that your accusation will hold up in court.

If you truly would like to know the secrets to get out of a speeding ticket, then visit my web site at www.TrafficTicketSecrets.com

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Damon Dallah is an expert in traffic ticket defense with an emphasis on speeding tickets. He's helped hundreds of individuals with no legal experience beat their tickets in court. He is the owner of a very popular web site that you can visit by clicking here: Traffic Ticket Secrets

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