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How To Minimise The Threat Of Mobile Security Breaches

Julie Lord
 


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A BT survey recently concluded that approximately forty per cent of businesses have experienced a mobile security breach. However, a lot of these companies did not merely experience one security breach on a mobile device. In fact, one fifth of those that suffered a mobile security lapse experienced more than four breaches. Clearly the threat of mobile security breaches is a very real one.

This is especially the case when you consider how rapidly the world of mobile Internet has boomed. Because of this, security is lacking. The increase in companies allowing employees to bring your own device (BYOD) is another reason why businesses are vulnerable to the threat of mobile security breaches, both internally and externally, as employees may mismanage the device without realising.

It is quite clear to see that all companies need to take steps to minimise the threat of mobile security breaches. The first thing you should do is seriously think about whether your BYOD policy is worth the risk. Of course there are many great advantages of BYOD, such as flexibility and lower costs. However, all of this may mean nothing if you suffer a huge security breach that damages the progression of your company and costs you an immense sum of money. It may be more appropriate to go for another policy that is of a much lesser risk, such as corporate-owned personally enabled (COPE) or choose your own device (CYOD). Aside from this, you also need to take steps to ensure that all mobile devices have adequate security measures in place.

All mobile devices need to have a password. You can find plenty of resources online about choosing an effective password. No two passwords should be the same.

You should never use a proper word and your password should be a random mixture of lower case letters, upper case letters, numbers and any special characters that are allowed. Moreover, if possible you should opt for two-step authentication. This is when you are required to input a password as well as an additional piece of information.

For instance, you may be asked to input a code that has been sent to your email address. Another option you should consider is going for a mobile phone service provider that actually has security packages in place. There are providers in the UK that offer different security bundles for businesses.

It is always advisable to go for the most advanced packages, so you can ensure the highest levels of security. Of course this is something that is only going to be highly effective if you elect to ditch the BYOD policy. In addition to this, it is vital to make sure that all smartphones are updated whenever the user is prompted. You should always accept an update because smartphones are often patched with the purpose of eliminating vulnerabilities that have been found since the phone was released. To ensure all employees are fully aware of the potential security risks consider sending them on IT security courses such as CISMP the Certificate in Information Security Management Principles. On a final note, the threat of mobile security breaches is clearly a very real one. Hopefully this article will have helped you to understand the basics when it comes to minimising the chances of such a breach happening to your business. A BT survey recently concluded that approximately forty per cent of businesses have experienced a mobile security breach. However, a lot of these companies did not merely experience one security breach on a mobile device. In fact, one fifth of those that suffered a mobile security lapse experienced more than four breaches.
Clearly the threat of mobile security breaches is a very real one. This is especially the case when you consider how rapidly the world of mobile Internet has boomed. Because of this, security is lacking. The increase in companies allowing employees to bring your own device (BYOD) is another reason why businesses are vulnerable to the threat of mobile security breaches, both internally and externally, as employees may mismanage the device without realising.
It is quite clear to see that all companies need to take steps to minimise the threat of mobile security breaches. The first thing you should do is seriously think about whether your BYOD policy is worth the risk. Of course there are many great advantages of BYOD, such as flexibility and lower costs. However, all of this may mean nothing if you suffer a huge security breach that damages the progression of your company and costs you an immense sum of money. It may be more appropriate to go for another policy that is of a much lesser risk, such as corporate-owned personally enabled (COPE) or choose your own device (CYOD).
Aside from this, you also need to take steps to ensure that all mobile devices have adequate security measures in place. All mobile devices need to have a password. You can find plenty of resources online about choosing an effective password. No two passwords should be the same. You should never use a proper word and your password should be a random mixture of lower case letters, upper case letters, numbers and any special characters that are allowed. Moreover, if possible you should opt for two-step authentication. This is when you are required to input a password as well as an additional piece of information. For instance, you may be asked to input a code that has been sent to your email address.
Another option you should consider is going for a mobile phone service provider that actually has security packages in place. There are providers in the UK that offer different security bundles for businesses. It is always advisable to go for the most advanced packages, so you can ensure the highest levels of security. Of course this is something that is only going to be highly effective if you elect to ditch the BYOD policy. In addition to this, it is vital to make sure that all smartphones are updated whenever the user is prompted. You should always accept an update because smartphones are often patched with the purpose of eliminating vulnerabilities that have been found since the phone was released. To ensure all employees are fully aware of the potential security risks consider sending them on IT security courses such as CISMP the Certificate in Information Security Management Principles.
On a final note, the threat of mobile security breaches is clearly a very real one. Hopefully this article will have helped you to understand the basics when it comes to minimising the chances of such a breach happening to your business.


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