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Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs What Will Your Insurance Policy Pay When You Break a CFL Bulb?

Russell Longcore
 


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Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL). . . Everybody's singing the praises of this new technology. And for good reason. . . they save tons of electricity.

But what happens if one breaks inside your house or business?

My opinion is that most people will simply sweep up the mess and not give it much thought. But there is a BIG, dangerous component in a bulb called Mercury, and mercury is one of the most toxic substances known to man.

If you break a CFL bulb, you'll likely find that the proper cleanup could be very costly. And you'll likely find that there is NO COVERAGE in your property insurance policy. Most policies have environmental cleanup exclusions. Even if your home is damaged by a tornado, hurricane or fire, the broken bulbs could cause you to incur thousands of dollars in environmental cleanup costs that your insurance policy will EXCLUDE.

Because CFLs contain a small amount of mercury, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends the following clean-up and disposal guidelines:(1)

1. Before Clean-up: Ventilate the Room

* Have people and pets leave the room, and don't let anyone walk through the breakage area on their way out.

* Open a window and leave the room for 15 minutes or more.

* Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system, if you have one.

2. Clean-Up Steps for Hard Surfaces

* Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.

* Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.

* Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes and place them in the glass jar or plastic bag.

* Do not use a vacuum or broom to clean up the broken bulb on hard surfaces.

3. Clean-up Steps for Carpeting or Rug:

* Carefully pick up glass fragments and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.

* Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.

* If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken.

* Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister), and put the bag or vacuum debris in a sealed plastic bag.

4. Clean-up Steps for Clothing, Bedding, etc. :

* If clothing or bedding materials come in direct contact with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from inside the bulb that may stick to the fabric, the clothing or bedding should be discarded. Do not wash such clothing or bedding because mercury fragments in the clothing may contaminate the machine and/or pollute sewage.

* You can, however, wash clothing or other materials that have been exposed to the mercury vapor from a broken CFL, such as the clothing you happened to be wearing when you cleaned up the broken CFL, as long as that clothing has not come into direct contact with the materials from the broken bulb.

* If shoes come into direct contact with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from the bulb, wipe them off with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels or wipes in a glass jar or plastic bag for disposal.

5. Disposal of Clean-up Materials

* Immediately place all cleanup materials outdoors in a trash container or protected area for the next normal trash pickup.

* Wash your hands after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing clean-up materials.

* Check with your local or state government about disposal requirements in your specific area. Some states prohibit such trash disposal and require that broken and unbroken mercury-containing bulbs be taken to a local recycling center.

6. Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rug: Ventilate the Room During and After Vacuuming

* The next several times you vacuum, shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system and open a window prior to vacuuming.

* Keep the central heating/air conditioning system shut off and the window open for at least 15 minutes after vacuuming is completed.

Man, they are serious, aren't they?

(1) Environmental Protection Agency, www.energystar.com

Copyright 2008 by Russell D. Longcore

P. S. I wrote a book that YOU need!

check out: http://www.insurance-claim-secrets.com

NUMBER ONE at Amazon.com in its category!

My blog is at: http://insurance-claim-secrets.blogspot.com

Nominated for Georgia Author of the Year Award 2008

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