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Preschool Science Experiments

 


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There is nothing more fascinating and fun than helping small children conduct preschool science experiments. Watching their delighted little faces as these experiments show them that there may be a bit of “magic, " after all, is so entertaining. There are many safe and educational experiments that can be done with the preschooler. They are not overly involved or difficult either.

One such experiment involves some raisins and a glass of Seven Up or Sprite. It is aptly named The Dancing Raisins. You simply take a glass of still fizzing Seven Up or Sprite and let the children drop a few raisins in the soda. The raisins seem to take on a life of their own. They jump around on top of the soda, then seem to dive to the bottom of the glass, only to rise up again. Children love preschool science experiments such as this one.

Another experiment can be used to teach about the parts of plants. For this one, you will need a stalk of celery, 2 cups of water and some food coloring. Add the food coloring to the water. Slice the celery in half long ways and put each end into the water. Within about 10 minutes the food coloring has been absorbed into the celery, outlining the veins of the celery stalk. Children are extremely fascinated with this one.

Now, if you don't mind messy preschool science experiments, you can try this one. The children get to make their very own slime to play with. You will need to get some liquid starch and mix it with a bottle of Elmer's glue. Once it has mixed together, it starts to make a totally different substance. The children can dig their hands in and start to pull out the “globs" to play with.

An easy and fun experiment that teaches about density requires first getting a glass. Next, you will take food coloring and add it to different substances such as water, oil, and salt water. These will be added to the glass one at a time, layering as they go. The different colors help identify each substance. This is one of the more fascinating preschool science experiments, as their little eyes just get bigger and bigger while watching these substances NOT mix.

Preschool is such an easy age to teach scientific things. They are delighted and thrilled by the simplest things. Not only that, you become a magician in their eyes, so you might let them guess at what has occurred just a little bit longer before explaining it to them. Then they will get to feel special that they can make these things happen, too.

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