Should I Take A Stained Glass Course?

 


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We have done some research to determine whether or not taking a stained glass course would benefit the beginner.

Learning how to make stained glass art can be a challenge and going from the idea of starting this wonderful hobby to actually making that first stained glass pattern is the toughest part.

There is a multitude of steps to take to get from A to Z. Taking a course would definitely cut down on the learning curve.

Below are our pros and cons to taking a live course, learning through a book, or studying stained glass art otherwise.

First, everyone learns differently. Some people pick things up after one shot. Some (like me) it seems to take a bit longer. People learn visually, from sound, touch, and many other ways, so it is tough to say that one way is the best.

Budget plays a big role as well as I have found people that were self-taught by picking up a few books at their local library to those who had to have the couple hundred dollar course.

Live courses at local shops: These are great. You can take a few hours here and there and spend time with others who share your passion. You’ll get to use their tools (most of the time), tap into more experienced stained glass enthusiasts, have instant critiques and the ability to make changes before you make mistakes.

Note though that these courses can get quite expensive as I’ve seen some going for upwards of $300 in some areas. There is a difference between the basics of making stained glass and more advanced techniques.

This comes down to how serious you are to pursue stained glass creation. Remember you must buy the tools, set up a workspace, buy the supplies, and spend the time enjoying your fun, new hobby. So perhaps dropping a couple hundo on a local course isn’t going to work.

On the other side, if you are one who gets frustrated easily and needs someone to turn to, then taking a few classes to get you rolling could be a good idea.

The other side of the spectrum is could you learn this from a book? The gentleman who I have met did just that. Now his thoughts are that if you really really want to learn something, you can. His determination to follow through on projects is amazing and it is the reason I call him “The Wizard. "

He does have a background working with his hands and found it easy to move his past experiences into stained glass. Personally, I think I would have a tough time trying to learn from a book, but it can happen.

To me it is like learning karate from a book, but he said that it was a lot cheaper and he was able to form his first piece this way. He did say that you must keep at it, you will make mistakes, and to keep going and learning with each mishap.

You can also learn from the Internet. Lately I have seen a number of tutorials and websites devoted to the art of stained glass. One thing I have found challenging and others have told me the same is that trying to do this after watching a video on your computer made it tough.

The Wizard gave it a shot and had a tougher time than utilizing a book. One thing I like about the web is that if you run into issues you can find others in groups and forums who are more than willing to help.

Finally, if you are on a stained glass budget or aren’t sure if you want to follow through with this hobby is to find an expert and order a DVD course. Now, a good DVD course will allow you to visually see the creation process from A to Z. It will also provide a manual that you can follow in and perhaps provide great resources for finding tools cheap and setting up your stained glass patterns.

In fact, The Wizard set up a 13" T. V. on his workbench so that he could watch as he hacked, cut, and formed amazing stained glass designs. He started with a book and when he wanted more advanced techniques and tips turned to a DVD.

This allowed him (and I’ve heard others say the same) to learn in the comfort of his own home for a fraction of the cost.

These are a few ways to get started making stained glass. Factors such as budget, time, commitment, and more play a big role in determining how you want to take this beautiful art.

Joe Collinsworth and The Wizard are teaching thousands how to set up their own stained glass hobby through mass education. Whether you are serious or not sure about making stained glass, we can help. Be sure to visit makestainedglass.com to learn more.

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