Dog Dominance Behavior - Need Help to Break Dog Possessiveness?

 


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In our series of articles on Dog Dominance Behavior, we explain various forms of dog instinctive behaviors, such as aggression dog dominance and possessive dog behaviors, and what to do about them. All such bad dog behaviors relate to each other and to dog pack instincts - the inborn drive for dog dominance and high position in the pack. Dog food aggression and dog possessiveness of a bone or favorite toy are among the most common expressions of dominance aggression in dogs, of the dog's quest for control.

These are potentially very serious and can develop or intensify when dog possessive behaviors are not corrected. Many of us have experienced the painful results … So let's explore how to break dog possessiveness with an example…

My hand was bleeding profusely from two puncture wounds that had been inflicted almost instantly by the defiant little one, aggressively testing the waters. I held the scruff of her neck firmly and snatched a Kleenex with the other hand.

She growled. I allowed her to release a little tension before I made a demand again. (I did not want to cause escalation. ) I did not back away, nor did I let go of her scruff. I did not request of her again until she released herself from that high tension level.

The pup then dropped the bone. I blocked her from it and claimed it as MINE. She tried to bite again. I held her firmly until she yielded.

I never let go of a dog when it is tense. Tension creates fear or feeds dog aggression - and either can lead to a nasty bite!

The pup was again calm. I placed the bone in front of her and corrected her with a pack bite when she touched it. Instinctively, she understood such corrective pack behavior and ceased her effort.

When she was patient and calm, I gave the bone to her and let her chew on it for a few minutes. Then I took it away again, just to remind her who really ran the show.

Aggression in dogs is not acceptable and must never be encouraged. Some have naively said: "Well, she only does that around her bone. "

My reply? "What if the dog will not give you something which may harm her?" Permit dog possessive behavior in one instance, and you encourage it in another when the consequences may be dire!

People are afraid to be bitten and usually back away when a dog shows his teeth. You must not do that. Backing down or catering to him at such times gives him power and serves to reinforce and intensify the problem. It assures that such aggression dog dominance behavior will recur, quite possibly with bloody results for you, the dog, or someone else! Take this seriously.

My dogs have their own toys and food bowls. They have bones and crates. However, I can touch or take anything I want, whenever I want. I am the undisputed Pack Leader, the Alpha, and they defer to me. That makes them feel secure and happy, and gives me a peaceful, loving home.

Dominant dogs have all others in the pack submit to THEIR will. They do not ask the lower ranked ones what they want - nor should you. Do not let the proverbial tail wag the dog, or you are in for much annoyance, unpleasantness, even nastiness.

If your dog shows possessive dog behavior, consult a professional and learn the technique well. Apply it with consistency, and do not let bared teeth cause you to back down and submit. The long term consequences would be worse than the present challenge. Even the best of us is sometimes bitten!

Want to Stop Bad Dog Behaviors, Dog Instinctive Behaviors such as Dog Dominance Behavior and Dog Food Aggression? Ask Dog Obedience Trainer - Dog Behaviorist, Rena Murray. Rena shares extensive Dog Behavior Modification experience, blending the best of the Dog Whisper Behavior and other dog training techniques in self-help Articles, free email Newsletter - PAW PERSUASION POINTERS , and more on her Dog Dominance Behavior web site and in her Paw Persuasion Blog. Contact Rena at PawPersuasion.com for the help you need!

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