Raising Kids with Non-Violent Behavior: 3 Affirmations That Build Character in Kids

Jean Tracy
 


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Jaclyn O'Malley published an article about a middle school student in the Reno Gazette-Journal last March. The student deliberately shot one classmate. A second bullet ricocheted off the floor and hit a nearby girl. The 14 year-old shooter did it because his classmates made fun of him.

Having been a child/family counselor, I know the pain parents feel when an enraged child becomes violent. I know how helpless parents can feel, and I know how parents can build character so that their kids choose non-violent behavior.

Using positive affirmations from early childhood can help. Below are 3 positive affirmations that increase non-violent behavior and build character too.

How positive affirmations increase thoughtfulness:

When your child invites a shy kid to play, you can increase your child's thoughtfulness with a positive affirmation like: “I'm pleased when you include kids who aren't playing -

Because it shows how thoughtful you are.
Because you just made (kid's name) feel welcomed.
Because you made sure everyone is having a good time. "

Your child is likely to increase non-violent behavior and include even more kids when playing. Your positive affirmation encouraged him. All kids crave encouragement. Your positive affirmation increased his character too.

How positive affirmations increase empathy:

When your child helps a fallen child with a bloody knee, you can increase your child's character with a positive affirmation like:
“I admire you when you help kids who are hurt -

Because you are taking care of others.
Because it shows that you think beyond yourself.
Because it shows you have a heart that cares. "

Your child is likely to increase non-violent behavior and continue helping kids. Your positive affirmation appreciated her. All kids crave appreciation. Your positive affirmation increased her character too.

How positive affirmations increase tolerance:

When your child forgives another child for teasing, you can increase your child's character with a positive affirmation like:
“I respect you when you forgive those who hurt you -

Because you didn't take the teasing personally. Because you realize words can't hurt you unless you let them. Because it takes a child with a big heart to forgive. "

Your child is likely to increase non-violent behavior and become even more tolerant. Your positive affirmation praised him. All kids crave praise. Your positive affirmation increased his character too.

You can raise a child with non-violent behavior. When you encourage, appreciate, and praise, you respect your child. Your child, in turn, will respect you and others. Why not use positive affirmations everyday and build character too?

Jean Tracy, publishes a Free top-rated Parenting Newsletter, Tips and Tools for Character Builders. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 Free Family Fun Activities to share with your kids.

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