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Five Signs of Prescription Pain Killer Addiction

Karen Vertigan Pope
 


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Fentanyl is a pain killer that is similar to morphine. Prescription use of this drug is to manage severe chronic pain, long-term pain or the pain associated with surgery. It is used for people who have exhibited a physical tolerance for other opiates in managing chronic pain.

Fentanyl is available in prescription form as Actiq, Duragesic and Sublimaze.

In the same way other opiates control pain, Fentanyl binds with the natural opiate receptors in the brain and spinal cord. These receptors are located in the part of the brain that controls pain and emotions. Opiates, like Fentanyl, increase the production of dopamine which increases the sense of euphoria in the person taking the drug.

Long term use of Fentanyl can lead to addiction by slowly replacing the natural pleasure reinforcers of the body. Increasingly, the user's ability to achieve pleasure from normal activities, such as association with friends and family, sharply decreases. This leads to the search for larger and larger doses to get the pleasure the user seeks. Natural reward mechanisms because desensitized because of Fentanyl addiction.

Any deviation from the prescribed amount of Fentanyl can result in addiction.

Fentanyl addiction is fairly easy to detect. The person taking the drug:

  • Takes more of the drug more often than originally prescribed by their physician
  • Has a compulsive need for the drug and feel anxious about getting a prescription refilled before it runs out
  • Is unable to quit the medication even if there is a sincere wish to do so
  • Allows the drug to disrupt their lives as more and more social and professional activities take a back seat to the users need for the drug
  • Commits illegal acts to obtain the drug, such as getting prescriptions from more than one doctor

If any of these symptoms apply to you or to someone you love, then you may want to seek treatment for addiction right away. If you think you are addicted either physically or emotionally to Fentanyl, talk to your doctor, a counselor or a substance abuse professional as soon as possible to avoid the inescapable dangers of Fentanyl addiction.

The Farley Center and Williamsburg Place are available to help. Their staff is caring and supportive. They understand and they want to help. Call the Farley Center at (800) 582-6066 for a free assessment interview and to get immediate referrals to a professional in your area.

Karen Vertigan Pope writes for Ciniva Systems, an award winning Virginia web design company. Ciniva specializes in web design and SEO. Ms. Vertigan Pope is an SEO Specialist with Ciniva. Ciniva Systems is in charge of SEO for The Farley Center and Williamsburg Place .

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