Already on ArticleSlash?

Forgot your password? Sign Up

Orthotics for Athlete's Foot

 


Visitors: 213

Athlete’s Foot is a fungal infection that typically effects the foot, and generally around and between the toes. Its observable symptoms are itchy, flaking skin, scaling and other irritation. Generally it is caused by an overabundance of moisture in and around the feet, and is typically transmitted from one host to another, very often via the floor of a communal shower, or other places where people walk with wet feet. As a result, one of the best ways to prevent, eliminate or reduce athlete’s foot is to walk barefoot in dry conditions as much as possible, and wear orthotics for athlete’s foot.

While walking barefoot may seem somewhat counter intuitive, it does provide the feet with the opportunity to dry and get access to sunlight, which are two things that are harmful to fungus. As long as the individual stays away from wet places where many people walk, it should be ok. In winter conditions, or in places where it’s not typically acceptable to be barefoot or in sandals, orthotics for athlete’s foot are a very good alternative as they are designed specifically to act against the causes of athlete’s foot, and prevent the conditions necessary for it to survive.

For instance, with orthotics for athlete’s foot, and more specifically those designed with EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate), are quite adept at dispersing moisture inside the shoe. This serves a dual purpose actually, as it prevents the fungus that causes athlete’s foot from forming, and the bacteria that cause foot odor. Both conditions require a moist, dark and warm area in order to survive. With the addition of orthotics for athlete’s foot, the moisture levels inside the shoes is reduced significantly, thus eliminating one of the three necessary conditions for that bacteria and fungus to survive. Furthermore, they also provide comfort for the individual wearing them, thus reducing the need to itch or scratch the affected areas.

In all, orthotics for athlete’s foot are an excellent alternative to being barefoot all the time. This is particularly relevant for people who live in cold climates, or simple during the winter when the weather simply does not permit not wearing shoes or socks outside. Furthermore, since the insoles are placed inside the shoe, there is no need for anyone to ever know that one is being affected by athlete’s foot. Some people can be a little embarrassed by the condition, so this is certainly an added bonus.

(443)

Article Source:


 
Rate this Article: 
 
The Problem of Athlete's Foot
Rated 4 / 5
based on 5 votes
ArticleSlash

Related Articles:

Should You Consider Orthotics for Your Foot Pain?

by: Dave Wilson (March 08, 2007) 
(Health and Fitness)

How To Get Rid Of Athlete's Foot

by: Shane Woods (April 22, 2008) 
(Health and Fitness/Home Health Care)

Athlete's Foot of Hands

by: Shane Woods (April 22, 2008) 
(Health and Fitness/Home Health Care)

The Cure For Athlete's Foot

by: Charles Nash (September 19, 2008) 
(Health and Fitness/Home Health Care)

Athlete's Foot Fungus

by: Shane Woods (April 22, 2008) 
(Health and Fitness/Home Health Care)

Caring Your Athlete's Foot

by: Ivy Ganong (March 03, 2012) 
(Health and Fitness/Skin Care)

Athlete's Foot Symptoms

by: Shane Woods (April 22, 2008) 
(Health and Fitness/Home Health Care)

Treatment of Athlete's Foot

by: Shane Woods (April 22, 2008) 
(Health and Fitness/Home Health Care)

Athlete's Foot Treatment Tell Me What I Need To Know

by: Jeff Foster (June 21, 2007) 
(Health and Fitness)

The Problem of Athlete's Foot

by: Low Jeremy (January 19, 2007) 
(Health and Fitness)