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Alternative Treatment For Posture

 


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Good posture is an effortless, non tiring stance that can be maintained for a long time. Your posture can be a reflection of your body attitude. A curvature is any deviation of the spine from its normal direction or position.

There are two basic spinal curves, which can be viewed from the side. When the posture is faulty, these curves become exaggerated or reduced. Lordosis exists when the neck and lower back dips in to display a ­curve. Seen from behind, lordosis is an exaggerated hollowing of the back. After time, this may result in a hollow, saddle, or sway back. Kyphosis occurs when the curve dips in the opposite direction, from the nape of the neck to the waist. Seen from behind, kyphosis is an exaggerated rounding or hump. After time, this may result in a humpback.

Viewed from the back, the shoulders and pelvis should be parallel and the head in line above the tail, displaying a straight vertical line. Scoliosis is a deviation from that straight line, where the spine curves from its central axis from side to side, resembling an S.

Poor posture results in a multitude of symptoms, such as back pain, headaches, general breathing and digestive difficulties, malaise, and feet problems.

Causes of bad posture include

training (children copy parental posture)

asymmetrical body use (maintaining the same stance for long periods)

fatigue (insufficient energy to maintain constant good body posture)

poor seating habits

illness (which may also cause fatigue and through that poor posture)

psychological problems (which are often manifested as introverted posture and hunched shoulders)

birth abnormalities (such as dislocated hips)

disease (such as polio and arthritis)

mechanical faults (including problems with the back, pelvis, knees, or feet).

Treatment

The conditions that are causing the postural problems must always be diagnosed and addressed in the first instance. When illness, disease, or congenital defects have been ruled out, the following treatments may be found appropriate.

Alexander Technique This will involve retraining with exercises. It is the most useful therapy for longterm postural improvement.

Diet and Nutrition Where energy problems or disease are at the root of the postural problems, vitamin and mineral supplements may be appropriate.

Osteopathy and Chiropractic The manipulanll therapies are excellent for overall postural treatment and retraining.

Feldenkrais Treatment will involve the restoration of natural energy flow, breathing, and less stressful patterns of alignment.

Rolfing Structural treatment breaks the cycle that can exist between pain/muscle tension/worse posture.

Yoga This is appropriate for mental and physical integration.

Read out for Detox diet . Check out arthritis treatment and medical tests

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