Coping with Fatigue

 


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Are you feeling tired a lot for no apparent cause or at least that you can think of? Ever wonder what is making you feel so tired all the time? Fatigue can have many different causes that may include:

  • Lack of sleep: You might be surprised to know that getting even an hour less than you normally get can leave you drowsy the next day. Is it because you did not go to bed early enough or you went to bed, but could not go to sleep. As a person gets older, it becomes more difficult to get uninterrupted sleep and you may sleep less soundly and/or awaken earlier.

  • Stress: Going through life each day stressed and anxious can keep you from relaxing and getting the rest you need.

  • Inactivity: If you are tired all the time, you probably feel “too tired” to exercise, so you don’t. When you do exercise and exert yourself, you probably get tired fairly quick because you are out of shape. You still need to exercise to beat both these situations. Moderate exercise for at least ½ hour or longer most days of the week helps reduce stress, improve the mood and will leave you feeling energized (once you get past the too tired feelings and the tired feelings from exertion). Be careful not to schedule your exercise sessions too close to bedtime, or you might have trouble getting to sleep.

  • Eating habits: Not eating properly or drinking enough fluids will cause your body to not get the fuel and fluid it needs. Avoid drinking beverages that contain caffeine close to bedtime.

  • Certain medications: Many different medications can cause fatigue, antidepressants, allergy medicines, antihistamines and many beta blockers can cause fatigue. Cold medications and pain relievers that contain caffeine and other stimulants can help to keep you up at night.

    Tips to battle against fatigue include:

  • Reduce your everyday stress: Say “no” more often. Set priorities. Organize activities to avoid confusion. Do something each day that you enjoy.

  • Manage workplace tension

  • Be active

  • Eat well

  • Avoid Alcohol

  • Avoid eating, reading or watching TV in bed.

  • Keep your sleeping room cool, dark and quiet.

  • Set your alarm for the same time each day (this routine can help you establish a regular sleep schedule).

  • Take only short naps early in the day

  • Schedule exercises at least six hours before bedtime

  • Eat small snacks before bed

  • Avoid large late-night meals

  • If you can’t sleep, do not continue tossing and turning, get up, go into another part of your house, read or relax until you feel drowsy, then return to your sleeping room.

    Source: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research

    Disclaimer: *This article is not meant to diagnose, treat or cure any kind of a health problem. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Always consult with your health care provider about any kind of a health problem and especially before beginning any kind of an exercise routine.

    This article is FREE to publish with the resource box. Article written 3-2007.

    Author: Connie Limon, Trilogy Field Representative. Visit http://nutritionandhealthhub.com and sign up for a weekly nutrition and health tip. The article collection is available as FREE reprints for your newsletters, websites or blog. Visit http://www.healthylife27.com to purchase an array of superior quality, safe and effective products inspired by nature, informed by science and created to improve the health of people, pets and the planet.

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