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Do NOT Buy the Cheapest Printer You can Afford

 


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This article is going to discuss electronics, specifically printers. Honestly, I do believe there are some cheap electronics such as printers that are great and can last for a long time. Cheap and durable electronic devices are pretty common and have a lot of value. This article is about value as well as price. For example purposes, you do the research online and purchase the most inexpensive printer on the Web for 15 bucks. $15 for a printer seems real cheap, and I would immediately think about that old saying “you get what you pay for. " Wouldn't you? The printer prints slowly, and the cartridges constantly need refilling. All other things equal, the cheapest printer will not perform as well as a premium printer, so this means that the cheaper printer will require more human maintenance. Let's compare this with a moderately, but still cheaply, priced printer. Let's assume this printer costs you $60. I think that this printer is definitely exponentially better, but marginally more expensive. At the risk of repeating myself, everything will just be better. Remember, I am not talking about two similarly priced printers. I am talking about the absolute cheapest printer out there, versus a printer that is a little but more expensive. (Honestly, in my experience, the absolute cheapest printers are not worth the cash, but even just the printers in the low to so-so price bracket are worth the money. ) On price alone, many consumers will go with the $15 printer because it's cheaper and it seems like a better deal. Do you follow? (Obviously, $15 is cheaper than $60. ) But let's look at this from a different angle. From here, let's call the $15 printer, “Printer C" (C for ‘Cheap'). Let's say Printer C breaks after one year due its low quality. Hey, at least you got one year out of it! So now you have to go to the store and get another printer. Even if you think this is remedial, you have to spend time, energy, and a little bit of focus to look for a new printer. However, let's assume that, had you bought the $60 printer, it lasts five years. We will call this “Printer E". ('E’ for “Expensive'). That's an amortized cost of only $12/year. Cheaper than Printer C overall. Anyway, maybe this is confusing. Anyway, I am trying to convince you to not own the cheapest printer. I think it is definitely prudent to find a printer that is anything but the very cheapest. I found a printer recently on the web for $30 that is of high quality! It had greater reviews than the $20 one. I spent an extra $10 on a way better printer. This, here, is my point! I know every dollar counts, believe me, as I worked for a bank for $10/hour. But I spent 10 extra dollars and may have saved myself a lot of time or money in the long term. Here's what I mean. The absoultely lowest priced printer is probably going to be of the lowest quality. Even the second lowest-priced printer is of a lot better quality than the absolute cheapest printer to own. Please remember that I am not a printer guru or a printer salesman. These are just my experiences and I want to share them with the rest of the world. Ok, so now here are the all-important concepts of “price" and “value". Drumroll please. Printer C saves you some money in the short term, but its quality is like its price: low. This causes you aggravation. Then Printer E comes along, which is the second-cheapest printer out there. Printer E turns out to do a great job for you. So if you ask anyone, in this case it is definitely worth it to pay a little bit more for a better benefit in the long (or even the short) run. Looked at in this way, we can say that it is more valuable to go with Printer E than it is to go with Printer C. When given the information of price only, most people would choose Printer C. But overall, based on everything, Printer E is the way to go. Bottom line: if you are really penny pinching, then by all accounts, go with C. But if you can spare $15 bucks and get a better value, heck, go for E. Paying marginally more for a printer that won't break the bank may save you a lot of time and frustration in the long run. This is my example using a printer to demonstrate price and value. Let's review: Price: Strictly the monetary cost of something. If the cost of a printer is $20, then that is its price. Get it? Got it? Good. Value: How good something is overall. For instance, a cheap printer has a low price, but it might have a low value if it causes you grief. However, if the $15 printer works like a charm and lasts a long time, it has a lot of good value. Through my own observations, I have noticed that many people make their decisions solely based on price. But I don't think this is a good idea. I try to make my decisions based on value. Take into account price and value of it. How well do you think it will work? Does “you get what you pay for necessarily ring true?" But any decision regarding something, like finding the cheapest printer to own, is more difficult is this tough economic time.

I believe there are some cheap electronics such as printers that are great and can last for a long time. Cheap and durable electronic devices are pretty common and have a lot of value. This article is about value as well as price.
For example purposes, you do the research online and purchase the most inexpensive printer on the Web for 15 bucks. $15 for a printer seems real cheap, and I would immediately think about that old saying “you get what you pay for. " Wouldn't you? The printer prints slowly, and the cartridges constantly need refilling. All other things equal, the cheapest printer will not perform as well as a premium printer, so this means that the cheaper printer will require more human maintenance.

Let's compare this with a moderately, but still cheaply, priced printer. Let's assume this printer costs you $60. I think that this printer is definitely exponentially better, but marginally more expensive. At the risk of repeating myself, everything will just be better. Remember, I am not talking about two similarly priced printers. I am talking about the absolute cheapest printer out there, versus a printer that is a little but more expensive. (Honestly, in my experience, the absolute cheapest printers are not worth the cash, but even just the printers in the low to so-so price bracket are worth the money. )

On price alone, many consumers will go with the $15 printer because it's cheaper and it seems like a better deal. Do you follow? (Obviously, $15 is cheaper than $60. ) But let's look at this from a different angle. From here, let's call the $15 printer, “Printer C" (C for ‘Cheap'). Let's say Printer C breaks after one year due its low quality. Hey, at least you got one year out of it! So now you have to go to the store and get another printer. Even if you think this is remedial, you have to spend time, energy, and a little bit of focus to look for a new printer. However, let's assume that, had you bought the $60 printer, it lasts five years. We will call this “Printer E". ('E’ for “Expensive'). That's an amortized cost of only $12/year. Cheaper than Printer C overall. Anyway, maybe this is confusing. Anyway, I am trying to convince you to not own the cheapest printer. I think it is definitely prudent to find a printer that is anything but the very cheapest. I found a printer recently on the web for $30 that is of high quality! It had greater reviews than the $20 one. I spent an extra $10 on a way better printer. This, here, is my point! I know every dollar counts, believe me, as I worked for a bank for $10/hour. But I spent 10 extra dollars and may have saved myself a lot of time or money in the long term.

Here's what I mean. The absoultely lowest priced printer is probably going to be of the lowest quality. Even the second lowest-priced printer is of a lot better quality than the absolute cheapest printer to own. Please remember that I am not a printer guru or a printer salesman. These are just my experiences and I want to share them with the rest of the world.

Ok, so now here are the all-important concepts of “price" and “value". Drumroll please. Printer C saves you some money in the short term, but its quality is like its price: low. This causes you aggravation. Then Printer E comes along, which is the second-cheapest printer out there. Printer E turns out to do a great job for you. So if you ask anyone, in this case it is definitely worth it to pay a little bit more for a better benefit in the long (or even the short) run. Looked at in this way, we can say that it is more valuable to go with Printer E than it is to go with Printer C.
When given the information of price only, most people would choose Printer C. But overall, based on everything, Printer E is the way to go.

Bottom line: if you are really penny pinching, then by all accounts, go with C. But if you can spare $15 bucks and get a better value, heck, go for E. Paying marginally more for a printer that won't break the bank may save you a lot of time and frustration in the long run.
This is my example using a printer to demonstrate price and value. Let's review:

Price: Strictly the monetary cost of something. If the cost of a printer is $20, then that is its price. Get it? Got it? Good.

Value: How good something is overall. For instance, a cheap printer has a low price, but it might have a low value if it causes you grief. However, if the $15 printer works like a charm and lasts a long time, it has a lot of good value.
Through my own observations, I have noticed that many people make their decisions solely based on price. But I don't think this is a good idea. I try to make my decisions based on value.

Take into account price and value of it. How well do you think it will work? Does “you get what you pay for necessarily ring true ?"

But any decision regarding something, like finding the cheapest printer to own , or even finding the best all in one printer , is more difficult is this tough economic time.

(1868)

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