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Will Using Insulin Leave You Vulnerable to Cancer?

Dane C. Fletcher
 


Visitors: 260

Insulin is a hormone which is prescribed to diabetics to help them manage their blood sugar levels. It's a highly anabolic hormone as well, which does lead to muscle growth not possible with any other compound or steroid.   Today's crop of professional bodybuilders are easily 30 pounds heavier than they were just a decade ago, and insulin is entirely responsible.

Insulin is not entirely safe.   If blood sugar levels become too low (if not enough carbs are consumed while using it), death can occur.   Diabetics tend to use the drug in small doses throughout the day.   Bodybuilders, however, use a bigger dose of it following a workout to facilitate the most possible muscle growth.   It's dangerous, and can lead to blindness, heart attack, stroke or seizure, and other organ failure.   However, the link between insulin and one particular kind of cancer has many researchers and users particularly concerned.

Cancer of the pancreas is one of the most dreaded diseases known to man.   Due to its location in the body, nodes or cancerous cells are rarely noticed until the body begins exhibiting some of the advanced signs of the illness.   By this point, treatment is often ineffective as the disease spreads through the body.   Pancreatic cancer is very deadly and scary on many levels.

Studies have shown that men with high insulin levels are twice as likely to die of pancreatic cancer.   It's unknown what causes the connection.   It may be the receptors in the pancreas are particularly sensitive to insulin, and cancer cell growth occurs as a result.   After all, insulin makes just about everything grow - muscle cells and cancer cells alike.

Insulin has long been considered a dangerous drug.   Many young bodybuilders have died suddenly and mysteriously in the last decade, and it's long been suspected that insulin was the cause.   However, that might only be the tip of the mortality iceberg.   We, the bodybuilding fans, may be about to witness a great deal of sadness in the professional bodybuilding ranks as this “insulin generation" reaches year 10, 15, or 20 of their reign, and long-term illnesses like pancreatic cancer begin to occur.

Time will tell if bodybuilders are affected on a mass scale.   All we can do at the moment is watch our own use and make the right decisions when it comes to whether or not to use the drug.   If you are not an elite professional bodybuilder, you do not need insulin.   Period.

Dane Fletcher is the world's most prolific bodybuilding and fitness expert and is currently the executive editor for BodybuildingToday.com. If you are looking for more bodybuilding tips or information on weight training, or supplementation, please visit http://www.BodybuildingToday.com , the bodybuilding and fitness authority site with hundreds of articles available FREE to help you meet your goals.

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