Is Traditional Publicity Dead?

 


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If you want to get into a long and painful conversation, simply ask any promotion agency or Fortune 500 exec about the many pitfalls and hardships or concocting convincing promotion. You hear buzzwords like “consumer-centric camp signs" or “fragmented promotion".

What is fragmentation exactly? It's the increase in the amount of available methods for getting your idea to your customers.

One of the fundamental hardships faced by any businessman is that promotion has changed and evolved over the last few years. Not limited to one area of promotion, these problems overflow into the electronic media as well and audio and visual media.

If fact, you might feel just a bit astonished by all of the various promotion choices. Do a Google search for promotion and you will find options like popups, popovers, RSS, flash video, audio messages and even animated “sales people" programmed to appear right on you website to interact with your customers. . . at that's only the tip of the iceberg!

Well, what about traditional promotion like billboards, television, magazines and radio then? Are they dead?

Not by a long shot. According to one top promotion mogul, traditional promotion methods are still around because they still work.

Figuring out who your target market is, what they want and how they search for that info is the trick.

Mark Twain said, “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of promotion. "

By fully understanding your customers, you can avoid wasting your money on useless promotion mediums and focus your money on those mediums that your customers actually use.

If your customers are people that are much less likely online, like senior citizens or the poor, then you should focus your money on the newspapers and magazines that they are reading, the television shows that they are watching and the radio programs that they are listening to.

If your target market is working parents, you need to know how, when and where they get their information. Is it on the Internet? What radio stations do they listen to? What magazines are they reading? Do they watch television? How? When? Why?

When you set out to create a highly convincing promotion campaign, you need to determine what your best options are.

Here are four ways powerful steps:

1. Know your customer. What do they need? Where do they dine? What do they watch? How old are they? Which places to they like to frequent? Do they need your product or services? Can they afford your service or product or is it too expensive for them?

2. Know your competitors. Be prepared to perform a bit of research. What are your three fundamental competitors doing to advertise their business? What methods of promotion are they using? How often are they promoting their business? Are they trying to reach the same customers as you are? How long have they been promoting their business? What idea are they sending to promote their business?

To differentiate and set yourself apart from the crowd, look at what your competition is doing right and then simply find convincing ways to make your promotion slightly better.

3. What are the “top dogs" in your industry doing? See if you can borrow some of their methods and adapt them to your budget and target customers.

4. Know your message. What are you trying to get across to your customers? What do your customers want to hear? Why should your customer purchase from you instead of another business? You absolutely have to make every single word count.

It is highly likely that your customers are more tech-savy than they were just even one year ago. The Internet has made unbelievable amounts of information accessible, but it also has contributed to the “information overload" consumers complain of.

Another side effect of the Internet is that your customers have probably become used to getting “instant gratification" when they are looking for information, products or services. They want to buy now and receive it right away because they simply do not want to wait. Are you able to meet your customers’ demands and give them what they want, when they want it?

Your promotion does not have to be everything to everyone. In fact, trying to be everything to everyone is a huge mistake. Keep it simple. Your promotion should address one person. . . your ideal customer. Remember, if you're giving your customers what they want, they don't perceive your ads as a nuisance, they see them as a service.

Pay attention to who your customers are and what they want and you will be at an advantage. Traditional promotion is not dead. . . far from it!

The Bank of Green puts money in your {hand|bank account|pockets) by giving you the best info on auto insurance, bankruptcy, banks, business plan, taxes and advertising amongst other topics.

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