Leading Change - A Manifesto for Change

Ed Kugler
 


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Leading organizational change requires a manifesto for change. Your manifesto begins by saying the following:

1. I understand that all progress requires change but all change is not progress.

2. I understand that all change comes from leadership but not all leaders can drive change.

Okay, if you truly get that the next step is to answer these two questions:

1. What problem am I trying to solve?

2. What will success look like when I solve it?

It’s important that you answer the two questions above. They are the key to your change success. Because you must know that the bridge between what problem you are trying to solve and what success will look like when you do will hinge on the execution of the following steps:

1. You must stop BS’ing yourself about where your organization is today. You must admit where you are and deal with it.

2. You must be brutally honest about where you want to go.

3. You must be realistic about the level of financial commitment that exists in your organization for the change you are leading. How real is the support? Is this support in keeping with what you know to be true about your organization spending money? Get real.

4. You must be realistic about the level of emotional commitment that exists in your organization for the change you are leading. Senior support of the changes must exist or you fail. Get real about whether your leaders have thought through the pain of change and are realistically willing to endure to the end.

5. You must know and accept that you cannot succeed at driving change in your organization without the unwavering support of the highest person in your organization that is impacted by the change you lead. Get real, if you don’t have their support you fail.

6. You must have the above five items in place and then I must have detailed plans that I execute daily, make changes as necessary and continue to do so until I succeed.

You must commit to live by the wise words of Alfred E. Newman of Mad Magazine fame when he said, “Just because everything is different doesn’t mean anything’s changed”. You must commit to insure that doesn’t happen on your watch. Make a difference and make your changes happen. That … is your manifesto for change!

Ed Kugler

Ed Kugler has been living change since the jungles of Vietnam where he was a Marine Sniper for two-years in the Vietnam War. He came home to a country he hadn't left and began work as a mechanic and truck driver. Since then he has worked his way into the executive suite of Frito Lay, Pepsi Cola and Compaq Computer where he was Vice President of Worldwide Logistics, a position he achieved with no college degree. Ed left in 1997 to consult and write. He is the author of Dead Center - A Marine Sniper's Two Year Odyssey in the Vietnam War and five other books and counting. He regularly consults with some o the nations leading companies on organizational change and coaches individuals to make the most of their lives. Ed is the father of three, grandfather to three and has been married to the same woman for 38 years and counting. http://www.nomorebs.com http://www.edkugler.com

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