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Literary Classics & Book Reviews Article Category 

Articles or Book Reviews written about published works that are widely accepted as Literary Classics.
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A goldmine Secret -On How To Get A Book Published

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 Oletu Maro (June 20, 2012)  For a first time author how to get your book published will be the first major task you will face but you don’t have to give up because you haven’t seen a publisher who will publish your book . I have come across many articles on how to get your books published, I have also seen testimonies on how people get their book published, I have three friends that their book is now .. (Literary Classics)

The Blind Owl - A classic tale of madness, obsession, betrayal & murder

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 Bobby White (August 26, 2011)  The Blind Owl, first published in Farsi in 1937 by Sadiq Hidayat/Sadegh Hedayat (unfortunately, both his first and last names are spelt differently, depending on which edition and in which country/language you buy his work) - and found it to be hallucinatory, sinister, troubling and strange - compellingly and powerfully so. The eeriness of the story has echoes of some famous stories in . (Literary Classics)

Joseph Heller's Catch-22 - a 20th century classic novel

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 Bobby White (August 24, 2011)  Joseph Heller's Catch-22 took some years to write and his concerted effort and talents paid off in what justifiably remains his most famous and read novel. It is a great satire on war (in this case World War 2 [WW2], though it applies equally to all wars), and it is a classic work of fiction. Please don't let the word ‘classic’ put you off or make you consider that in any .. (Literary Classics)

Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea - a 20th Century Classic Novella

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 Bobby White (August 22, 2011)  Rhys wrote this as a novelistic, literary response to Charlotte Bronte's classic novel Jane Eyre. (If you haven't read the latter, it is not necessary to do so first, in order to appreciate Rhys’ work; however, if you do read it first, then Wide Sargasso Sea afterwards, it will give you a richer, deeper appreciation of just how clever and powerful Rhys is in this novella. ) The .. (Literary Classics)

Stefan Zweig's Beware of Pity - a 20th century classic novel

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 Bobby White (August 20, 2011)  This is a beautifully written, deeply moving novel, set in 1914 in a small, provincial garrison town near the Hungarian border, told in retrospect, using the present tense, by Anton Hofmiller, principal character, a second lieutenant in the army. Bored with the town and his dull life (while being a good Army man, disciplined and focused, and respected by his charges), he accepts a .. (Literary Classics)

Louis-Ferdinand Celine - Death on the Installment Plan

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 Bobby White (August 20, 2011)  This was Celine's second novel after his now-classic Journey to the End of the Night, and it effectively acts as a prequel to his first novel, as this focuses on Ferdinand Bardamu's (Celine's fictional alter ego) troubled childhood and youth in Paris. What matters most, when you read Celine, is experiencing his intense emotional and intellectual viewpoint. It is a voice of desperation, . (Literary Classics)

Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - a 19th century classic novel

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 Bobby White (August 19, 2011)  First, just a quick though important note about the choice of which edition to buy. Obviously there are far cheaper editions that still retain a quality compared to the one I've listed here (Penguin Classics, 2006 edition - see my link for it in the final paragraph below), such as the one from the always wonderful Wordsworth Classics publisher - Jane Eyre (Wordsworth Classics). However, . (Literary Classics)

Celine's Journey to the End of Night - A 20th Century Classic Novel

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 Bobby White (August 18, 2011)  This disturbing novel almost won the Prix Goncourt Prize for fiction, the most notable award at the time for French fiction. It deserves to have won all the literary awards at the time of publication. Since its first publication in 1934, it has remained continuously in print, and still remains controversial for the political (fascistic) viewpoint of the novelist in his personal life .. (Literary Classics)

Hubert Selby, Jr.'s Last Exit to Brooklyn - A 20th Century Classic Novel

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 Bobby White (August 17, 2011)  Selby has been described as a ‘clinician of violence whose novels have the immediacy of art’ (Josephine Hendin, Vulnerable People: A View of American Fiction Since 1945 (A Galaxy book)), which I think is true; likewise, he is a literary master of demonstrating through his characters a moral ugliness, misogyny and despair whose power as a novelist is unmatched and .. (Literary Classics)

T. S. Eliot's insightful essays and literary criticism - he's not just a great poet!

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 Bobby White (August 17, 2011)  In ‘Selected Essays’ by T. S. Eliot, published by Faber and Faber (1999, third edition), you will find an outstanding selection of essays by this famous poet, as well as a superb introduction and anthology of his literary/intellectual/cultural passions and pursuits. Understandably, he is still mostly known only for his poems - well, at least in schools, where he's taught in .. (Literary Classics)

Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev - A wonderful 19th century Russian novel

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 Bobby White (August 17, 2011)  Because there are several editions of this novel available to buy, and some much cheaper than this one, I first wanted to highlight that I believe this one is by far the best to date, for two reasons: the translator, Rosemary Edmonds's version, is elegant and smooth, and her own introduction is excellent - providing meaningful reflection and understanding not only of the novel, but .. (Literary Classics)

Book Review: "Breath" by Tim Winton

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 Marco Gustafsson (August 23, 2010)  “Breathless” might be a more appropriate title for this very different coming-of-age tale. It’s different not because it deals with growing up in a unique way, but because it’s about much more than young boys becoming young men. One persistent theme that permeates the narrative is danger. All the main characters court it, constantly pushing themselves perilously .. (Literary Classics)

The Secret of Charles Dickens

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 Bob Forster (December 20, 2008)  Charles Dickens is one of the best known authors of the 19th Century and probably one of the best all time story tellers. His imagination has given birth to classics such as A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, David Copperfield and many more. The amazing thing about the stories of Dickens is the messages with in them are as relevant today as they were when they were written. I believe .. (Literary Classics)

The Wealth of Nations

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 Vincent Li (December 17, 2008)  I doubt any students to the elusive subject of economics have actually read the ingenious masterpiece of Adam Smith - “The Wealth of Nations". I was tempted but, frankly, never have the courage to test out my perseverance in ancient prose - though attracted by the ancient but timeless wisdom. So I was delighted to find “P. J. O'Rourke on The Wealth of Nations" on a bookshelf . (Literary Classics)

On "Anthem"

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 Vincent Li (December 17, 2008)  Anyone who has read George Orwell's 1984 may find some resonance in Ayn Rand's Anthem. They both depict a futuristic world where those in power exploit the collective mass in the name of brotherhood, although the two stories differ in plots, emphasis and style. The terror of collectivism is vividly played out in 1984 with all the Big Brother's monstrous tactics of control, for rooting .. (Literary Classics)

Act Like an Educated, Refined and Sophisticated Date With These Books

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 Otto Kreistler (October 30, 2008)  There was a time when books were considered to be strictly the domain of nerds, of those who spent about 90% of their waking moments in their rooms, and generally of those who would probably work at universities or at NASA twenty years from now. Not that there is anything wrong with any of these but of course it is never a good thing to be labeled uncool. Good thing times have now .. (Literary Classics)

The Great Gatsby - Is Nick Carraway Gay?

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 Marciano Guerrero (October 27, 2008)  In The Great Gatsby Scott Fitzgerald presents a study of wealth and ambition through the prism of pathetic characters for which one can find almost no socially redeeming values. What The Great Gatsby portrays is the sordid story of small band of feeble characters engaged in cheating, adultery, deception, and debauchery. The lavish parties -Jazz-age style- that Jay Gatsby throws to .. (Literary Classics)

Great Gatsby - Is Daisy Buchanan Retarded?

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 Marciano Guerrero (October 27, 2008)  Nick Carraway, the narrator, makes much of Daisy's beauty and her sultry voice. But it is through dialogue and action -through her own words and duplicitous behavior- that we can detect her mental flaws. Lord Francis Bacon in his essay on Beauty said, “There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. " This quality of strangeness is the fact that .. (Literary Classics)

My Top 10 All-Time Favorite Books, For the Lack of a Better Word

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 Jamie Quaranta (October 01, 2008)  "Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (1957) By Theodore S. Geisel I have memorized every single line without looking at every single page in this timeless classic since I was five years old. Nough said? "Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal" (2001) By Eric Schlosser I will never eat at McDonald's and Burger King again!! "Are You My Mother?" (1960) By P. .. (Literary Classics)

Haven Kimmer's Iodine A Brilliant But Disturbing Novel!

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 Glenda Bixler (September 27, 2008)  Iodine By Haven Kimmel Free Press ISBN: 978-1-4165-7284-8 221 Pages Iodine by Haven Kimmel, New York Times bestselling author, was a very disturbing book for me. I could not say I liked it, but I feel compelled to give it high praise for what Kimmel has created in this portrayal of her character, Trace Pennington. If you dare-enter her psychotic mind: "I never I never had sex with my .. (Literary Classics)

Knowledge of What's on the Other Shore - Count Dracula Knows the Horror Beyond Death

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 Marciano Guerrero (September 24, 2008)  Dracula is a book one has to revisit once in a while. Finally it dawned on me that Dracula scares us not because of his appearance or ill-fame, but because the fiend knows something we don't: non-human knowledge. Bram Stoker's Dracula is one of the scariest books ever written, and the reasons for its perennial appeal are basically two: (1) The vampire theme in which the supernatural is . (Literary Classics)

1984 - George Orwell - Indicative Summary Notes

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 S Dey (August 28, 2008)  1984 is an English novel written in 1949 - envisaging life in 1984 under a totalitarian regime. It tells the story of Winston Smith, a middle-aged, unhealthy person who is a protagonist, working at the Ministry of Truth. His job is to edit historical accounts to tailor to the policies laid out by the government. Power is split into three major groups of stake-holders: namely, Eastasia, . (Literary Classics)

Book Review of Shakespeare's Macbeth

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 Bipasha Chowdhury (August 27, 2008)  Macbeth by William Shakespeare Macbeth is one of most famous plays and a great tragedy of Shakespeare. It is also named as ‘The Scottish play’. The title itself suggests the name of the protagonists. The whole play revolves around the protagonists Macbeth and his wife Lady Macbeth. “Macbeth" means “son of life", and is a Christian name rather than a patronymic. .. (Literary Classics)

Books - What to Buy (Barnes and Noble - Amazon) And What Not (What's Free)

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 S Dey (August 25, 2008)  The perception In general, the popular perception is that every book needs to be bought and read - if one wanted to read legally. Evolution of sources of books The obvious choice is to buy the books from the bookstore as and when they are released. Or, even many days, months and years after they are released. Physical bookstores did that always - this is the traditional way of buying .. (Literary Classics)

Marking 50 Years of Achebe's Things Fall Apart - Maintaining a Proud Presence in World Literature

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 Arthur Smith (August 20, 2008)  50 years ago in 1958 a young Nigerian, Chinua Achebe, at the young age of 28, made major breakthrough for African Literature with the publication of his novel Things Fall Apart. This novel became widely read and recommended in schools and colleges all over the world. I could remember reading it for two years in succession 30 years ago when I was in secondary school in Freetown, Sierra .. (Literary Classics)

Erewhon by Samuel Butler

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 Migel Jayasinghe (August 18, 2008)  The mid-nineteenth century dystopian novel Erewhon ‘caused a sensation’ (Erewhon, Wordsworth Classics, pbk1996, back page) when it was first published annonymously by its then little known author, Samuel Butler. It had taken him more than a decade to complete (1860 - 1871) with finally its publication in March 1872. Some of the later chapters on ‘Machines’ had .. (Literary Classics)

Review - Around the World in Eighty Days

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 S Dey (August 09, 2008)  Jules Verne (February 8, 1828 - March 24, 1905) - the French author who pioneered Science Fiction ("Sci-Fi") writing - had created one of his best works ever work in form of “Around the World in Eighty Days". This is a novel where a man goes all around the world in only 80 days at an era where aeroplanes didn't exist. The main characters in this work are: Phileas Fogg - The .. (Literary Classics)

Book Review - Native Son by Richard Wright

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 Jennifer Cuddy (August 03, 2008)  It's 1940's America. African Americans are sitting in the backseat of city buses, toileting in designated ‘For Coloreds Only’ public restrooms; banned from voting, segregated geographically, psychologically, and banned from most tertiary universities. A national issue, segregation at the primary and secondary levels, white school boards grossly underfunded black-only .. (Literary Classics)

"All" is Well in Shakespeare's All's Well That Ends Well

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 Griffin Thomas (August 01, 2008)  "All's Well That Ends Well": it's a phrase that rolls off the tongue without stirring much more than a pleasant sensation, but with layer upon layer of thought encoded in its monosyllables. One could write an entire doctoral thesis on the significance of this modest yet rich phrase. Too, one could write reams about the many layers of meaning to this play. “All's Well That Ends .. (Literary Classics)

Take a Tour of Writers' Homes

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 Winston Burton (July 29, 2008)  So the Library of America's great coffee-table book, American Writers at Home, comes as a delight to those of us who yearn to see where the masterpieces we read were created. And the book is a treasure-trove of such delights. Here the reader explores Robert Frost's Derry, New Hampshire farmhouse, gets to see Hemingway's portable Royal typewriter in situ, and learns - perhaps for the .. (Literary Classics)

Dox Quixote by Miguel De Cervantes Possibly the Greatest Novel Ever

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 Adrian Carpenter (July 29, 2008)  Don Quixote is often nominated as one of the world's greatest works of fiction. (Most recently in a poll of leading authors around the world conducted by the Norwegian Book Clubs in 2002). The novel's landmark status in literary history has meant it has had a rich and varied influence over later writers, from Cervantes’ own lifetime to the present-day. Miguel de Cervantes .. (Literary Classics)

Emma Jane Austens Finest Novel

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 Adrian Carpenter (July 18, 2008)  First published in 1816 and generally considered Jane Austen's finest work, Emma is a comic portrayal of a heroine whose insensible interferences in the life of a young live-in servant in a nearby village often lead to misunderstanding and embarrassment. Emma was written and published in less than two years, while Jane Austen was living at Chawton in Hampshire. Although it lacks the .. (Literary Classics)

Sense & Sensibility - Jane Austen - The Greatest Artist That Has Ever Written

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 Adrian Carpenter (July 14, 2008)  A recent and very successful BBC production of Jane Austen's “Sense and Sensibility" has brought to the fore one of England's most successful authors although, her six novels remain popular throughout the world. The writer, George Eliot, has said that Jane Austen was “The greatest artist that has ever written. " Jane Austen was born in 1775, at the Rectory in Steventon, a .. (Literary Classics)

Rip Van Winkle

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 John Schlismann (July 02, 2008)  I believe Washington Irving's purpose in writing Rip Van Winkle was to teach his readers a lesson as well as entertain. Irving is telling his readers through this story that if you live an idle life, never accomplishing anything, and are always satisfied with the bare minimum life will pass you by. Rip Van Winkle is a character who always has been, is, and always will be. There are .. (Literary Classics)

A Character Analysis of Hawthornes Young Goodman Brown

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 John Schlismann (July 02, 2008)  What created Goodman Brown? A man so tormented by what even he considered to be a dream that it changed his life in a profound negative way forever. Goodman Brown was man plagued by his own conscious; he was someone who believed himself to have committed grave sin by meeting with the devil and participating in a witches meeting in his dreams. This spoke of an era where people were .. (Literary Classics)

An Analysis of the Birth Mark by Nathaniel Hawthorne

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 John Schlismann (July 02, 2008)  As in all of Hawthorne's writings when one finishes reading his stories you come up with more questions than answers. No other writer makes you question like Hawthorne. The philosophical question of what is true perfection and can it be achieved through physical means or is it a state of the spirit is the heart of Nathaniel Hawthorne's story The Birth-Mark. Aylmer, the main character .. (Literary Classics)

Richard Wrights Last Literary Efforts and Last Days on Earth in Exile in Paris

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 Arthur Smith (June 24, 2008)  Richard Wright moved to Paris in 1946, with his wife and a 4 year old daughter. He met among others Gertrude Stein, Andre Gide Simone de Beavoir, Aime Cesaire and Leopold Senghor. He even assists Senghor, Cesaire and Alioune Diop in founding the Presence Africaine magazine. He returned to the United States only briefly. He then returned to Paris and became a permanent American .. (Literary Classics)

Wright Sharpens His Conception of Literary Form and the Relationship Between Fiction and Marxism

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 Arthur Smith (June 22, 2008)  The autobiographical account of Richard Wright's life ends in “American Hunger" the sequel novel to “Black Boy" when Richard finally realizes the incredible power that his words will eventually have. He decides that he will use his words as weapons, appealing to the humanistic and emotional qualities in man and society. As a young man living in Memphis, Tennessee, Wright .. (Literary Classics)

Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut Briefly Reviewed

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 Cris Cuthbertson (June 19, 2008)  Slaughterhouse five is a classic book that everyone seems to have a bit of trouble understanding fully. Fertile ground for English Lit students, it seems to leave half the LibraryThing reviewers a bit stumped. "So it goes. " Who says I should read it? "Having fought in the Second World War, been imprisoned, seen thousands dead, and witnessed the devastating fire-bombing of Dresden, the . (Literary Classics)

Foe By J.M. Coetzee

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 Raja Sharma (May 15, 2008)  In his novel ‘Foe', J. M. Coetzee has reconsidered the events of ‘Robinson Crusoe’ from a new point of view. Almost everybody in the field of literature is acquainted with the hardships which Robinson Crusoe had to bear in his adventurous journeys. Crusoe had spent 28 years, 2 months and 19 days on the island. In Crusoe's story, the author, Daniel Defoe, presents his .. (Literary Classics)

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

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 Ross Gill (April 01, 2008)  Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - 5 things you should know. Well, six actually if you include the fact that there are now four different Jane Eyre audio books you can download. This is a great way to learn Jane Eyre quotes and get to know the characters and how they pronounce the Victorian English, especially the fully dramatized version which features Claire Bloom and Sir Anthony Quale. . (Literary Classics)




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