Teaching English in Mexico: Mexico City Part 2

Larry M. Lynch
 


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Getting To and Away From Mexico City:

For the most detailed information on flights and sample R/T fares to Mexico City on the internet you can visit:

http ://www.mexicana.com. mx/Mex-E-Savers/home1.asp

Getting To or From The Airport

Don’t get taken for a ride !

TAXIS: WARNING! WARNING! WARNING!

ONLY “OFFICIAL" TAXIS SHOULD BE USED IN MEXICO CITY.

Taxi rides from the airport to the “Centro" or downtown area, also known as the Historic District, should cost around 80 to 100 pesos. Find the “sitio official" kiosko and pay your taxi fare there. It’s a small building or booth near one of the terminal entrances. DO NOT EVER go with anyone to a taxi and pay cash to them or the driver no matter how nice and friendly / helpful they are ! They are going to rip you off BIG TIME – or worse.

Taking a taxi: Whenever you take a taxi in Mexico City you MUST go to a “sitio official" booth or kiosk and pre-pay the fare. Tell the agent in the “kiosko" where you’re going (or show them a paper or card with the written address of your destination) pay them the fare and they’ll give you a “paid" receipt which you in turn will give to the taxi driver when you get to where you’re going. DO NOT pay cash to the driver. Give them the paid receipt ONLY. Taxi crime is a serious problem in Mexico City. Be very careful !

From the Historic District : you can get an “official" taxi from the Hotel Canada (talk to the hotel desk clerk first) or from the Zocalo on the corner directly in front of the Cathedral (talk to a policeman or a tourism policeman in the Zocalo). The desk clerk at your hotel may also be able to call a radiotaxi for you. Ask them the fare to where you’re going.

Taxi rides from the Historic District to the TAPO bus terminal, should cost around 25 pesos in an “official" taxi. Other taxis will charge you 75 or 80 pesos MINIMUM and may not be safe.

Getting Around Using Mexico City’s Vast Metro

For getting to the Historic District from the airport and each of the four main bus terminals using Mexico City’s vast Metro system the directions individually are as follows:

From Mexico City International Airport

Take the subway line “Terminal Aerea" (line 5) located in front of the airport in the direction of “Pantitlan", change to line 1 in the direction of “observatorio" then get off at “Pino Suarez" station and transfer to line 2 in the direction of “Cuatro Caminos". Ride the train to the “Zocalo" station and get off there.

From the North Bus station ( Autobuses del Norte) Take the subway “Autobuses del Norte" (line 5 ), found just outside the terminal in the direction “Pantitlan" and there change to line 1 in the direction “Observatorio" to the “Pino Suarez" station. At “Pino Suarez" station transfer to line 2 in the direction of “Cuatro Caminos". Ride the train to the “Zocalo" station and get off there.

From the TAPO bus station

Take the subway “San Lazaro" (line 1) located just outside the terminal in the direction “Observatorio". Get off at “Observatorio" and transfer to line 2 at the “Pino Suarez" station in the direction of “Cuatro Caminos" and get off at the “Zocalo" station.

From the Observatorio (West) bus station (also called Terminal Central Poniente)

Take the subway “Observatorio" (line 1) from right outside the terminal in the direction of “Pantitlan". Get off at the “Pino Suarez" station and transfer to line 2 in the direction of “Cuatro Caminos". Ride the train to the “Zocalo" station and get off there.

From the Taxqueña (South) bus station (also called Terminal Central del Sur)

Take the subway “Taxqueña" (line 2) from just outside the terminal in the direction of “Cuatro Caminos" and get off at the “Zocalo" station.

In the next, part 3 of this “Teach English in Mexico" article series, TEFL teachers will start exploring job options in the Zona Rosa and beyond. Be sure to check out my other articles in the two continuing series: Teaching English in Mexico and Traveling in Mexico. If you would like more information, have questions or comments, the author can be e-mailed at: lynchlarrym@gmail.com

Prof. Larry M. Lynch is an ELT Teacher Trainer, English language learning expert author and university professor in Cali, Colombia. He has published more than 350 articles and academic papers and presented at numerous EFL teacher training and TEFL conferences throughout North America, South America and Europe. For comments, questions, requests, to receive more information or to be added to his free TESOL articles and teaching materials mailing list, e-mail: lynchlarrym@gmail.com

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