Landscape Photography Compositional Rules Of Engagement Make Easy

 


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When you are faced with a landscape before you, where should you point your camera lens too? Where are your points of reference and which objects should be the focus points? To have a good composition within the photo, you will need to know how to make use of some simple techniques to get the best result. Below are four simple compositional rules of engagement which you can consider.

Use of Lines. Lines are used so as to lead the eye to the main subject in the frame. Lines in the landscape can be created from row of trees, a fence, a pathway or bending of rivers. For example, a pathway starting in the foreground could run into the frame franked by two rows of trees by the side and lead to a majestic castle in the distance.

Use of Geometric shapes. You will never shortage of objects during your landscape photography session. Look out for distance objects in your frame. The easiest way is to create triangles. Frame an object in the foreground, one in the middle distance and the final one at the far distance. Linked them all up to form a three corners imaginary triangle.

The rule of thirds. This is the probably the most well-known compositional tool in landscape photography. It works extremely well. Essentially, you have to divide your frame into nine squares. That is, two vertical lines and two horizontal lines spaced equally. With this, you will have four intersection points whereby you can place the main subject for a balanced composition. For example, you can place a monument in the foreground and on one of the intersection points. In addition, you can also place the horizon on the horizontal lies.

Using frames. Using frames is another good method to capture the main point. You can use a wide range of objects as frame. However, probably the most popular and easy object to use is the tree or bushes. The overhanging branches of the tree positioned at the edges or the top of the frame will naturally lead the eye towards the main point of interest. You can also consider to line the bushes at the bottom edge of the frame.

Capturing awesome landscape views is interesting, rewarding and fulfilling. With the use of some simple compositional rules of engagement, you will have a remarkable and memorable photo. For pictorial illustrations of the above technique, please visit Landscape Compositional Rule.

John Peace enjoys photography and maintained a website providing information on photography. He invites you to visit his website, Freelance Photography to learn more about this exciting hobby. You can even make a living out of it!

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