The Truth About Tupperware - Can You Make Money Selling Tupperware?

 


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Tupperware is undoubtedly one of the most trusted names in house wares. With high quality products and detailed design features they have a very successful business going. However, is this business successful to those at the sales level? Can you really make an income as a Tupperware representative? Just how flexible and home-based is this business?

In 1946 Earl Tupper introduced his Tupperware products in retail stores. With his product not catching on, he in response came up with the now very well known Tupperware party. What was once a stay-at-home Mom daytime gathering in the 50's is now a night out for the girls! Home parties remain a key sales strategy and it is said that a Tupperware party begins every two seconds somewhere in the world. Tupperware has a wide variety of products that is ever increasing. From the usual stay fresh containers, they have grown to also include a chef series of cookware, dessert mixes, home decor items, and even toys.

The initial cost to join is about $79 which is pretty reasonable for starting a business. Included when you join is $250 worth of products to use for demonstrations. Online training is available to aid you in selling and recruiting. Here is the basic compensation plan breakdown; 25% of the profit from each sale, a 5% bonus if you make at least $1200 in a one month period, a 10% bonus if you make at least $3200. In order for you to earn a residual income on any recruits you are required to maintain $500 in personal sales each month and must maintain at least $2000 in total team sales. If you fail to do so, you will not earn the commission on the sales of your recruits. This percentage, if earned, ranges from 4-8%. You would personally have to make over $1000 in sales in a month just to make $250. That is a lot of parties, calls to friends and family, and sales pitches.

In conclusion, being a Tupperware consultant is a legitimate way for someone to make extra money by hosting parties, selling products, and recruiting. After researching this opportunity I have decided that Tupperware sales isn't for me but may be a great opportunity for someone who isn't tied down with children and would enjoy hosting parties in other people's homes. Lets be honest, don't we all open up the little invitation in the mail and go, “Ugh, another Tupperware party. . . "? Although it can be a fun get together with the girls, who enjoys pushing products on their friends and family?

Jeff & Leah Daane are top internet marketers who, along with their team, are driven to help others succeed at meeting their goals and aspirations. To learn more about Jeff & Leah Daane and their team of Marketing Mentors Click Here.

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