Public Relations 101: Getting Your Message Out

 


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Perhaps you'd like to promote your organization's event. Maybe you're trying to publicize your cause. Or maybe you're trying to get media attention for yourself or your product. Sometimes it's difficult to have your voice heard amidst the cacophony of competing messages.

The mainstream media often refers to today's information overload. After all, people get their information from more sources than ever before. There's broadcast news, cable news, newspapers, magazines, radio, online publications, bloggers, discussion boards, RSS streams, and more.

It seems, however, that people aren't overwhelmed with information; they're simply customizing the way they receive information. As for the mainstream media's hype about overload, it may very well just be a case of sour grapes. When people turn to other sources for news and information, the market share of the mainstream media decreases.

When you're trying to get your message out to the masses, follow the lead of public relations professionals. Their approach to promotion is to use multiple channels, both in traditional media and in new media. By blanketing as many channels as possible, your efforts at public relations and promotion are bound to be successful.

When you want to get the word out, you first need to define your audience. Who is it that you're trying to reach? If you're trying to market your message to 18-34 year olds, you don't want to waste your time with media that draws an older crowd.

Once you define your audience, you need to craft your message.

Indeed, if you are using multiple channels or trying to reach more than one audience, you may have to craft several messages. For each, it's important to try and see the world through the eyes of your intended audience, and the design a message that they will find appealing.

When you know your audience and have your message, it's time to distribute that message.

Although that can seem like an obstacle for an amateur, there are actually many venues through which you can do public relations and promotion. There are even online marketing opportunities that allow you to post free press releases and offer free public relations services.

One such service is pr-inside.com.

It's a free public relations service that helps you in promotion - whether you're promoting your online business, your organization, or yourself. You simply register and submit your free press releases. It takes about five minutes, after which the pr-inside.com team reviews your text and adds it to their public relations website.

There's no need to be intimidated by the competition from big public relations firms or the savvy mainstream media. With some forethought and a targeted message, you can publicize your message effectively using free online marketing tools.

Chris Robertson is an author of Majon International, one of the worlds MOST popular internet marketing companies on the web. Visit this Business and Entrepreneurs Website and Majon's Business and Entrepreneurs directory.

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