Introducing New Ideas or Innovations

 


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Masterminds recognize patterns around them and usually come up with new ideas. Archimedes found his principle, the law of hydrostatics, while he was taking a bath and ran out yelling, “Eureka” because he was so excited. I suppose Newton felt a similar emotion when the apple hit his head, no matter how much pain the impact produced.

Strangely enough, new ideas that cause leaps in human progress are more liable to get rejected than old stale ones. Human beings measure any new idea against what they already know. Consequently, the more unusual an idea is, the more liable it is to be made fun of or get rejected. During the eighties, I bet many people, starting with Bill Gates’ teachers, shook their heads disapprovingly, when he announced he was quitting school-Harvard University to boot-to find his own way and build his own company.

Taking into consideration the resistance to new ideas and new ways of doing things, how can one assure the success of his new approach? Or if one has a new idea on how to do anything new, what kind of a business or sponsorship can he search for?

The first step could be to investigate for sponsorship within a business community. A place to start the search is probably in the area of one’s interest, inside companies, businesses, or groups of people who are always coming up with new ideas, different products, diverse and better supplies. Original models in an area may develop usually because a new incentive is launched inside an existing condition. A revolutionary and better-working operating system for computers should not be searched in the plumbing supplies area, but in the vicinity of the computer companies that are noted for their ground-breaking procedures.

After canvassing the immediate area, the next step is to look at the surrounding areas. An innovative theater company, for example, may decide to give a chance to a poet to read his poetry before the curtain rises, if he has the talent for reading poetry.

Following that, one might try the more remote areas, even plumbing supplies for an operating system if a plumbing company is using a computerized system of any kind. That may be possible only if one is ready to modify or reallocate his ideas and apply them to different patterns with an eye for the appeal or the possible rejection of his new approach. The trick is to find out what is or is not working with the existing system and take it from there.

Some companies, as well as people, are more open to novel approaches in increments, rather than sticking out their necks totally with a unique project. A well-thought out positioning and presentation by the owner of the new idea or invention could overcome this inflexibility. Any company whose goal is progress would not turn down a novel idea if the concepts are explained clearly; if the continuity during the product development is guaranteed; and if the assurances are given that action and method will work in step with each other.

If none of these approaches work, the only way out for the innovator is through his own resources. Depending on one’s own resources takes a longer time to reach one’s ideals; however, one does not have to adapt his unique product to anyone else’s criteria and the command and gain will belong to him alone.

When one is presenting an invention on his own, he will need services and help. At this junction, he may have to look for funding from non-profit organizations or outside connections and strategic partnerships, while making sure that his product never loses its quality. In addition, the innovator can draw in volunteers with the lure of sharing the credit when things get going. A new product, be it an idea or a tangible object, needs to be advertised. A resourceful innovator will look for high-interest, low-cost ways of getting the word out.

New ideas necessitate new associations to take hold and grow. Networking with other innovative industries or businesses inspires more flow and creativity in one’s vicinity. At times, small groups may join together for big results. Surely, no one can go at it alone even if the novel product is the most fantastic invention after the wheel.

Joy Cagil is an author on a site for Writers (http://www.Writing.Com/ ) Her education is in foreign languages and linguistics. In her background are varied subjects such as psychology, mental health, and visual arts. She has been taking some courses on business and finance matters during the last couple of years. Her portfolio can be found at http://www.Writing.Com/authors/joycag

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