Taking a New Job, Relocation Mental Preparation


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If you have ever made a major relocation, moving from one city or town to a completely different area, then you know how stressful that type of move can be. The advent of the information age didn't do a lot for the mitigation of that stress like we had been lead to believe it would.

Get all the information you need, always at your fingertips, be worry free, no more making uninformed decisions. Some how those types of claims have done little to relieve stress, the fact is they may have been instrumental in bringing about even more stress for us to deal with in our daily lives.

When computers, big networks, and the internet came into being, we were all told how much easier they would make our lives. What they have in fact done, by speeding up the processing of information, is to increase competition in the market place making it necessary for almost everyone to get MORE done in less time to be able to just stay in the game. Sure we have all this information at our fingertips, but information that is not acted upon is next to worthless.

Getting more done requires more action. More action requires more decisions. More decisions via the concern about making the right decisions, causes more stress in our lives. It's a snowball effect really. So when it comes to taking the time to move to a new location, the though process needed to complete the task many times takes a back seat to what might be considered more important decisions.

Do you really want to make a bad moving decision? What might the consequences of making a bad moving decision be? Don't be fooled into thinking that that it couldn't happen to you. To do so could set you up for a very hard fall.

Where we live and how we view our position in our surroundings is a crucial part of who we are. Not only in our family and personal lives, but professionally as well. Because our environment affects us directly in many ways, care should be given to the decision process that will determine the relocation spot. Moving to a location where we don't feel at ease, regardless of how well that new job pays would be a large mistake. Moving to someplace where we just can't feel comfortable in our own space will do nothing but pile a mountain of stress onto our already stressful lives.

How much money is your health worth? Taking that job that looks really good on your resume and pays 4 times what you make now doesn't look so appealing once you find out that to take the job you have to live at the base of an active volcano or in the middle of a bone dry desert.

Even though those types of analogies aren't all that fair to make, because for some, those may be just the kind of places they have been looking for. For most though, to move to those places would place them under tremendous amounts of stress.

So many times when a new job comes our way, we tend to want to make snap decisions based on money and prestige, not seeing the big picture, and we end up making bad decisions. Not about our ability to handle the job, or about our calculation of income, but rather our lack of knowledge about necessary relocation factors.

Many a good person has taken a promotion that required relocation, thinking that they could adjust, only to find out later that had they known the full scoop, they would not have opted to take that job. Sure their income increased, but their quality of life dropped dramatically due to the inability to adapt to a particular set of surroundings or a particular climate or environment

So if and when that new job requires a relocation, use a good thought process to mentally map out your move. Take the time to do a “hands on" inspection of the new location if at all possible. You can see a million pictures of a desert and still not actually know how hot it really gets. Consider hiring a professional moving consultant who can put you in touch with the right real-estate people if needed. They can do the legwork of having to find the proper spot to match your lifestyle in the new location.

Build a good mental picture of you in your new job in your new location. Then analyze that mental picture against the facts and information you can obtain about the job and location. Do they line up? Does the new location meet your expected needs personally; will it meet your family's needs, and will it be a place that you can be comfortable? If you can't answer emphatically yes to all the above, it might be time for pause.

Scott Best is a freelance writer in association with http://rentaltruckcentral.com Read more from Scott at http://rentaltruckcentral.com/articles/


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